History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 46, No. 12, December

A Cancan Too Far
* Lap-dancing or table dancing, a form of striptease in which a client pays for a one-to-one performance by the girl of his choice, is currently extraordinarily popular in the United States and it threatens to take off in Britain too - if local authorities...
A Dictionary of the English Language
What makes a classic? Some would define it as a work that embodies timeless virtues of style or content; others as a work that speaks to the human condition across the ages; others as a work that bears translation into languages other than that in...
Ireland's Famine Museum
THE GREATEST SOCIAL catastrophe of nineteenth-century Europe happened in Ireland 150 years ago. The failure of the potato crop in successive harsh winters saw a huge fall in a population conservatively calculated at 8,175,124 in the 1841 census. As no...
I Was a Communist for the FBI
Dan Leab looks at a classic Cold War movie and the shadowy figure who inspired it. The icy moment marking the outbreak of the Cold War after 1945 remains a matter of vigorous debate. Yet, whatever the many controversies about the outbreak of this...
Museum of Lincolnshire Life
* Such a quantity of bygones is assembled here that you begin to wonder whether the people of Lincolnshire have anything much over twenty years left in their houses at all. Their former possessions are guarded in a red-brick fort of 1857, originally...
New Men? the Bourgeois Cult of Home
John Tosh examines the intriguing tensions between masculinity and domesticity in 19th-century Britain. In 1831 John Ruskin's father, a wine merchant, wrote home from (a business visit to Carlisle, `Oh! how dull and dreary is the best society I fall...
Royal Greenwich Up the Creek?
GREENWICH? ISN'T THAT WHERE the Millennium Exhibition will (touch wood) open at the end of 1999? Well, yes and no. The exhibition site is actually on the North Greenwich Peninsula, on a redundant gasworks site near the Blackwall Tunnel and about three...
Scotch-Comfort and Joy
As Yuletide and Hogmanay approach, distillers in Scotland and wine and spirit merchants the world over are stocking up with whisky. Sassenachs may have produced in Shakespeare the `immortal bard' but it is Scotland that has produced the `immortal bottle',...
The Return of Catherine the Great
Tony Lentin gives the latest upgraded assessment by historians of Russia's larger-than-life empress in the bicentenary year of her death. After seventy years of neglect and dismissal in the Soviet period as a foreign adventuress, hypocrite and poseur,...
Why Chamberlain Really Fell
Tony Corfield offers a provocative new interpretation of the events that brought Churchill-to power in the spring of 1940. The occasion of the fall from power of Neville Chamberlain and his replacement as prime minister by Winston Churchill in May...

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