History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 44, No. 7, July

'A Snarling Roughhouse:' the Democratic Convention of 1924
Edward Ranson describes how an extraordinary 17-day political dogfight in New York, seventy years ago this month, revealed the faultlines in American society in the Roaring Twenties. The 1920s in America have attracted a large number of epithets...
Friends, Romans or Countrymen? Barbarians in the Empire
Lead in the water, over-indulgent lifestyles, rampant inflation -- the list of explanations for the fall of the Roman Empire in the west has been endless. But in a new study, Stephen Williams and Gerard Friell turn the spotlight on the |barbarians'...
Guilding the Lily
Rustic pursuits such as men shearing sheep and wheelwrights restoring a Sussex tug (cart) are not sights one normally expects to see in the courtyard of London's Guildhall. Nor is it usual to find goldsmiths in the Great Hall or, come to that, for...
Horror Comics: The Nasties of the 1950s
* |Moral panic' occurs when the official or press reaction to a deviant social or cultural phenomenon is |out of all proportion' to the actual threat offered, implying a periodic tendency towards the identification and scapegoating of agencies whose...
Hutterians
A former tuberculosis sanatorium in Sussex today houses the Darvell Bruderhof, Britain's only Hutterian community. Here, 250 |brothers and sisters' live according to the model of the early church, uncompromising in their Christian ethic. All property...
Myth History in William Tell's Switzerland
The story of William Tell successfully shooting the apple from his son's head, riposting Austrian occupiers and subsequently steering an uprising of free Swiss peasants to independence, has long been regarded by historians as on the same level of myth-history...
Not Just Any Old Iron
The V&A have recently opened their new 1[pound] million Glass Gallery to great acclaim, but this month sees the re-opening of part of another gallery which has undergone a facelift -- albeit on a much tighter budget. This is the Ironwork Gallery....
Royal Recovery
Royal William Yard, standing dramatically at the tip of the Stonehouse peninsula in Plymouth, has been described by Pevsner as |among the most remarkable examples of an early nineteenth-century planned layout of industrial buildings anywhere in England'....
Splitting Images: Communication in Classical Athens
Athens without its citizens, a silent city, would still have had the appearance of a democracy. Many of its laws were inscribed in stone; the visual environment communicated powerful ideological messages through depictions of the archetypal myths and...
The Cavendish Collection
Manchester has the largest Jewish community in the country, outside London, and the museum, which is ten years old this year, is the only one in Britain in a synagogue. It is probably also the only one which is the direct outcome the writing old a...
The Democratic Development of the Former Soviet Union
When Western observers assess the likely democratic prospects of what was the Soviet Union, they tend to maintain that its peoples lack a representative tradition on which to build, and to cite the uncertainty, inefficiency, disorderliness and crises...
The Great Pagoda at Kew
The towering Pagoda in the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew is perhaps the most ambitious garden structure built in the Chinese style in Europe in the eighteenth century. It is a relic of the taste for exotic and often ephemeral garden buildings which...
The Neuroses of the Railway
From the beginnings of their development in the early nineteenth century, railways inspired deep anxieties and provoked strong opposition. The common factor in much anti-railway discourse -- whether couched in environmental, medical or social terms...