History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 60, No. 5, May

Adolf Eichmann Kidnapped in Argentina
It was Eichmann who inspired Hannah Arendt's phrase 'the banality of evil'. A career civil servant in Nazi Germany, he was put in charge of administering the 'Final Solution' and organised the seizure of Jews from all over Europe and their transportation...
An Extraordinary Rendition: When Napoleon Surrendered Himself to a British Naval Captain after His Defeat at Waterloo, the Victors Were Faced with a Judicial Headache. Norman MacKenzie Asks Was St Helena Britain's Guantanamo Bay?
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] On July 15th, 1815, after being defeated at Waterloo and deposed in Paris, the former Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte presented himself to Captain Frederick Maitland, commander of HMS Bellerophon, which was blockading the exit...
Birth of George I
The baby born in Osnabruck that day, christened Georg Ludwig and known in the family as Gorgen, began life with two distinct advantages. He was born and bred a Protestant and he was descended in the female line from the royal house of Stuart, which...
Captain Jennings Causes Chaos: Early 17th Century England Saw the Emergence of Pirates, Much Romanticised Creatures Whose Lives Were Often Nasty, Brutish and Short. Adrian Tinniswood Examines One Such Career
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Where are the days that have been ... when we might do what we list, and the law would bear us out in it? When the whole sea was our empire, where we rob at will?' (Andrew Barker, A True and Certaine Report of ... two late...
Charting a Future Democracy: The Chartists' Campaign for Political Inclusion and Social Justice Ended in Failure. but, David Nash Argues, Their Ideas Still Have Much to Offer Britain's Discredited Parliamentary System
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Many contemporary commentators are pessimistic about the nature of British Parliamentary democracy and despair of its future. The voting turnout in local, national and European elections has been in steady decline for decades....
Cometh the Finest Hour: 70 Years Ago, in May 1940, Winston Churchill Replaced Neville Chamberlain as Prime Minister. but the Great War Leader's Rise to Power Was Far from Inevitable. Taylor Downing Explains What a Difference a Day Made
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Around 4.30pm on May 9th, 1940 a meeting took place at 10 Downing Street that would change the course of British and world history. Four men were present: Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, who had called the meeting; Lord...
Diving Deeper: The Award-Winning Film-Maker Laurence Rees Describes How the Creation of His New Website Devoted to the Second World War Transformed His Views on the Future of History Education
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] About three years ago, when I was still at the BBC, I was contacted by a 17-year-old schoolgirl from Kansas. She was working on her high school dissertation on the origins of the Holocaust and a friend had told her that I...
Dr Trelawney's Cabinet of Historical Curiosities: This Month's Subject: Badgers
A Shorte Dictionarie for Yonge Begynners: gathered of good authors, specially of Columel, Grapald and Plini was a standard school book of the 16th century, compiled by John Withal (d. 1555). Its topics were organised by subject rather than alphabetically....
Election of John XXIII to the Papacy
In the years before 1410 more popes chose the name John than any other. Since then there has been only one. The appalling reputation of John XXIII saw to that. The Great Schism in the Roman Catholic Church began in 1378 with two popes, one in Rome...
Extreme Reactions: The Ministry of Education in the Czech Republic Recently Issued Guidelines on How to Teach Children about the Country's Totalitarian Past. Not Everyone Is Pleased
With neo-Nazis getting ever more vocal in the Czech Republic and the Communist party making its presence felt in parliament, the ministry of education under the current caretaker government recently decided that history teaching in both primary and...
From the Editor
The campaign for the General Election which takes place in the United Kingdom on May 6th holds even more hazards than usual for an embattled political class. It is the first to feature live television debates between the three main party leaders, where...
History Blogs: This Month Nick Poyntz Examines the Rapid Rise of Blogging among Both Professional Historians and Amateur Enthusiasts
Blogs--short for 'weblogs'--are a form of online diary or commonplace book. They allow an individual or group to share ideas via the Internet with other people. Their content ranges from scattered thoughts to lengthy essays, as well as pictures and...
Horace Walpole and Strawberry Hill
Horace Walpole and Strawberry Hill The V&A, March 6th to July 4th, 2010 www.vam.ac.uk/exhibitions [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Of all the world's great collectors, I can't help thinking that Horace Walpole (1717-1797) must have been among...
Michael Foot: A Hazlitt for Our Age: The Late Labour Leader, Who Died in March Aged 96, Was the Last Great Radical Voice of Parliament and Stands Comparison with the Celebrated 18th-Century Polemicist
The Times journalist Peter Riddell once saved Michael Foot from being run over. Foot was about to step in front of traffic on Hampstead Hill when Peter pulled him back. 'Oh, thank you,' said Foot. 'I was thinking about Hazlitt.' William Hazlitt...
Never So Good Again: By the Time the Sixties Arrived, with the Welfare State Established, Britain's Baby Boomer Generation Was Having a Ball. but Its Obsession with Novelty and a Lack of Respect for the Traditions of Its Elders Sowed the Seeds of Today's Anxieties, Argues Francis Beckett
The year 1956 was when the old Britain died and a new one was born. It was the year that so many of the old assumptions were shattered: that Britain was a great power; that being British was something special; that politics and political dogmas and...
No Gifts for the Greeks: The Current Economic Plight of Greece Is Part of a Long Feud between Athens and Europe's Great Powers
The debt crisis of 2010 is the latest round in a long-running battle between Greece and Europe's larger states. Financial issues are frequently flashpoints. Over the last 200 years the background to these repeated crises has been Greek insistence on...
Pride, Joy and Tragedy: Corinne Julius Is Impressed by the Breadth of Material on Display at London's Newly Reopened Jewish Museum
The only museum in London dedicated to a minority group (and the oldest one at that) has a difficult remit. The Jewish Museum aims to be a resource not just for the Jewish Community (which is itself fragmented), but for society at large. To this end...
The Ancient World
Like a Roman of the Dark Ages, camped out amid the ruins of a vanished order and listening to the occasional crash of falling masonry, historians of the ancient world have long had to live with a consciousness of decline and fall. Time was when a knowledge...
The Making of the Wars of the Roses: Anthony Pollard Visits the History Today Archive to Examine Alan Rogers' Claim That a Lack of Principle among Rival Lords Resulted in the Great Conflagration of 15th-Century England
When he wrote this essay in 1967, Alan Rogers was a young researcher at Nottingham University and part of the new wave of historians setting out to rescue the 15th century from neglect. Because this period of perceived lawlessness and disorder seemed...
The Murder of le Roi Henri: In May 1610 Henry IV of France Was Assassinated by a Religious Fanatic Apparently Acting Alone. Though Popular, Henry Had Nevertheless Aroused Animosity on His Way to Kingship, Not Least Because of His Protestant Beliefs
Paris was in festive mood on the morning of May 14th, 1610. The queen of France, Marie de' Medici, had been crowned the previous day at the basilica of Saint Denis and was due to make her formal entry into the capital. As usual on such occasions much...
What Mary Knew: Patricia Fara Explores the Scientific Education of Mary Shelley and How a Work of Early Science Fiction Inspired Her Best-Known Novel Frankenstein
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Ever since Boris Karloff's striking performance in 1931, Mary Shelley s Frankenstein (1818) has symbolised everything that seems bad or frightening about science--the atomic bomb, genetically modified foods, luminous transgenic...
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