History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 55, No. 1, January

Before New England: The Popham Colony: Richard L. Pflederer Visits the Site of the First Short-Lived English Colony in Maine Set Up in Competition with Jamestown in Virginia, and Considers a Remarkable Map of It Drawn by One of the Colonists
IN LATE SEPTEMBER, 1608, a courier arrived at the gates of the Spanish royal residence at Madrid after a journey of several days by road from the coast. He was carrying a dispatch to Philip III from Don Pedro de Zuniga, Spanish ambassador in London....
Birth of Alexander Hamilton: January 11th, 1755
ONE OF THE heroic figures of American independence was born on the island of Nevis in the British West Indies in 1755 or 1757. He himself seems to have been confused about the year, but 1755 is currently considered the more likely. He was his parents'...
Bishop Thomas Watson (1637-1717)
Those who personally benefited from the regime of James II were the subjects of deep suspicion after the 1688 Revolution. Thomas Watson, who had been made a bishop--and therefore also a member of the House of Lords--under the Catholic monarch in 1687,...
Black Birds of Doom: Boria Sax Finds Modern Myth-Making at Work in the Apparently Timeless Legend of the Ravens in the Tower
THE FAMOUS RAVENS OF THE TOWER OF LONDON add a primeval presence that the building itself - for all its being steeped in history, legend and ceremony--strangely seems to lack. Like everything else in the Tower, of course, they are heavily exploited...
'Bloody Sunday' in St Petersburg: January 22nd, 1905
THAT SUNDAY MORNING in St Petersburg (it was January 9th, Old Style), some 150,000 people gathered at the six designated assembly points to converge on the Winter Palace and present a petition to the Tsar, Nicholas II, who as the 'little father' of...
Born to Kill: 'Warrior Races' in Medieval Europe: Len Scales Considers the Complex Role of Martial Skill in the Development of National Identity in the Middle Ages
'AMERICANS ARE from Mars and Europeans are from Venus', proclaims Robert Kagan in Paradise and Power. his provocative dissection of 'America and Europe in the New World Order'. published in 2003 at the time of the US-led invasion of Iraq. Though steering...
Chersonesos: The Ukrainian Pompeii: Danny Wood Visits a Remarkable Excavation in the Ukraine
CHERSONESOS IS AN ENORMOUS, ANCIENT RUIN alongside the Ukrainian city of Sevastopol, on the shores of the Black Sea. The expansive site is a mix of Greek, Roman and Byzantine remains; and, hundreds of hectares of ancient, agricultural farmland that...
Child Murder in Georgian England: Anne-Marie Kilday and Katherine Watson Explore 18th-Century Child Killers, Their Motivations and Contemporary Attitudes towards Them
AT ONE LEVEL THE convictions of the child murderers Ian Huntley (December 2003) and Francisco Montes (June 2004) have allowed the British public to close the book on a traumatic chapter in the nation's recent history, for two of the most reviled men...
Dear John ...: Bendor Grosvenor Reveals for the First Time a Letter by Queen Victoria, Which Sheds Light on the True Nature of Her Relationship and Feelings for Her Man-Servant John Brown
AT 10.40PM ON MARCH 27TH, 1883, Queen Victoria's highland servant John Brown died at Windsor Castle. The unconventional, hard-drinking, good-looking Scot, who had for the last twenty years been Victoria's 'constant companion', succumbed painfully to...
Death of Dorothy Wordsworth: January 25th, 1855
DOROTHY WORDSWORTH lies buried in one of the most beautiful churchyards in England, at Grasmere in the Lake District, with her brother William, his wife Mary, and other members of the family. She is remembered for her delightful diaries, which were...
History in the Media
The largest collection of medal records went online for the first time on Remembrance Sunday 2004. Among the 5 million First World War medal records were those of Sir Winston Churchill, poet Wilfred Owen, the future Edward VIII and composer Ralph Vaughan...
Make Poverty History
BOB GELDOF AND CLAUDIA SCHIFFER, plus a host of churches, charities, aid agencies and NGOs, are calling for 2005 to be the year in which we 'make poverty history'. They want to use the opportunity presented by the British presidency of the EU, and...
Not All That Again: Jonathan Conlin Reads 1066 and All That, a Book That Served as a Point of Departure to So Many People, Seventy-Five Years after Its First Publication
'HISTORIES HAVE previously been written with the object of exalting their authors. The object of this History is to console the reader. No other history does this.' When it came to launching their 'memorable history of England' in 1930, Walter Sellar...
Remembering Conrad Russell: Benedict King Pays Personal Tribute to a Great Historian and Teacher
IN HIS BOOK, An Intelligent Person's Guide to Liberalism, (1999) Conrad Russell, who died on October 14th, 2004, argued that the Liberal party was the longest unbroken political tradition in the country, from its origins in the seventeenth century...
The Black Legend of the Dudleys: Derek Wilson Explores the Myths and Truths about the Famous Family, Whose Fortunes Were So Closely Connected to the Tudor Dynasty
Historians are--or, at least, should be--fair-minded, conscious that we have in our hands the reputations of men and women are not around to defend themselves. It is, therefore, surprising to discover not just one individual, but three generations...
The Great Fear of 1947 Could France Have Gone Communist? Martin Evans and Emmanuel Godin Ask How Close Was France to Becoming a Communist Country in the Years after the Second World War
ON OCTOBER 4TH, 1944, Pablo Picasso formally joined the French Communist Party (PCF) at the Paris offices of L'Humanite, the party newspaper. Attended by the poets Louis Aragon and Paul Eluard, the painter Andre Fougeron and the writer Albert Camus,...
Unravelling the Da Vinci Code: Bill Putnam and John Edwin Wood Peel Away the Evidence to Find an Extraordinary Hoax at the Heart of Dan Brown's Bestselling Novel
THE GREATEST PUBLISHING SUCCESS of last year was Dan Brown's novel The Da Vinci Code, with its headline-grabbing suggestion that Jesus escaped death on the cross and travelled to the south of France, where he married Mary Magdalene and raised a family....
Witnessing a Revolution: This Month Marks the 100th Anniversary of St Petersburg's Bloody Sunday. the Manchester Guardian Was There
IN DECEMBER 1904, on the eve of the 1905 Russian Revolution, Harold Williams arrived in St Petersburg as the first permanent correspondent of the Manchester Guardian in a foreign capital. His appointment reflected the commitment of the newspaper's...

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