History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 47, No. 7, July

An Eyewitness to King Cromwell
Joad Raymond on a previously unpublished insight into the personality and projection of `Lord Oliver' during Britain's unique 1650s experience. Historians have tended to present the Protectorate of 1653-1658 as a monarchy by another name, something...
A Patchwork of Internment
One of the most fruitful areas of new historical research in recent years has been oral history- capturing the testimony and interpretations of those who have lived through the twentieth century and showing how those accounts both model and are modelled...
Bolivia's Jesuit Missions
* Until quite recently, the tropical lowlands that stretch to Brazil, in Bolivia's eastern region, were neglected to an extent remarkable even for what is commonly described as the poorest country in South America. Government and tourist interests...
Bristol's Judaica Project
Earlier this year Bristol's new Architecture Centre on Narrow Quay played host to a fascinating exhibition of photographs of Historic Synagogues of the World. It came from New York, and this was one of only two British showings. So why Bristol? An...
Cairo's Music for All
* An old 750-seat cinema in Cairo's Marouf Street became the unlikely repository for a burst of cultural activity among the British conscripts stationed in the city during the Second World War. Still fondly remembered as `Music for All', it was the...
China's First Local Elections
With Hong Kong returning to Chinese rule, Roger Thompson looks to a time when the colony was among the influences on reformers who tried to bring the ballot box to the Middle Kingdom. A century ago, as China was still reeling from the repercussions...
Copper-Bottomed History for Jordan
Archaeologists believe that one of the most beautiful wadis in Jordan could turn out to have been the site of the biggest copper mining centre in the Middle East. Over the next ten years, experts from Britain and Jordan will be carrying out a...
Franco's Nazi Haven
* An eleven page document recently discovered in the archives of Spain's Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores lists more than one hundred active Nazis provided with asylum and new identities at the end of the Second World War. This merely confirms Spain's...
July 7th, 1647: Masaniello's Naples Revolt against Spain
The extraordinary nine-day wonder that saw a , Neapolitan fishmonger s son at the head of popular insurrection against Spanish overlordship should be seen in the general context of challenges to the status quo throughout the Habsburg domains which...
July 9th, 1797: Edmund Burke, Political Writer and Philosopher, Dies
Edmund Burke breathed his last in Beaconsfield, at the heart of the Home Counties. a place with which one of British Conservatism's most seminal figures, Benjamin Disraeli, was later to associate his peerage. But as with Disraeli himself Burke's background...
Mirth and Subversion: Carnival in Cologne
Masking discontent -- James M. Brophy describes how the fun and frolics of Carnival in 19th-century Cologne held a subversive hidden agenda of protest against Prussian overlordship. Let no one jest you: fun is a serious matter. Why and how people...
The Father of European Federalism?
* In what was otherwise a dull election campaign, two issues became salient which threatened to accelerate the collapse of the United Kingdom as a state. One was `Europe', the other, the future of Scotland. The first divided the Conservative Party...
The Sack of San Vincenzo Al Volturno
Richard Hodges unites oral tradition and archaeological evidence to reconstruct the story of the Dark Age destruction of an Italian monastery `They ... suddenly attacked the sacred monastery in a frontal assault, and surrounding it on all sides they...
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