History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 55, No. 2, February

Archibald Campbell, 8th Earl and 1st Marquess of Argyll (1607?-61)
When Archibald Campbell, Marquess of Argyll, was beheaded in Edinburgh in May 1661, it was the last act of a long and chequered political career. This month's Commons Sense deals with a Scottish peer and Westminster MP whose past caught up with him...
Auschwitz: The Forgotten Evidence: Sixty Years Ago, on January 27th, 1945, the Red Army Liberated What Was Left of the Auschwitz Extermination Camp. Taylor Downing Reveals Extraordinary Aerial Photographs of the Camp Taken during the Summer of 1944, Which Pose Awkward Questions about Why the Allies Did Not Act to Stop the Killing
ON AUGUST 23RD, 1944 a Mosquito aircraft of the 60th Photo Reconnaissance Squadron loaded up with camera and film to fly a long 1,200 mile mission over southern Poland. The aircraft was based at the recently captured Foggia airfield in south-east Italy...
Burying the Bones of the Past: David Anderson Looks at the Contentious Issues Raised as Kenya Comes to Terms with the Colonial Past
THE END OF BRITISH COLONIAL RULE in Kenya was bloody and brutal. In October 1952 a state of emergency was declared to fight the Kikuyu insurgents known as Mau Mau. The rebellion was defeated by 1956, hut emergency powers remained until January 1960....
Churchill the Historian: Winston Churchill Wrote History with an Eye to His Eventual Place in It, David Reynolds Tells Us. His Idea of History Also Inspired His Making of It
WINSTON CHURCHILL'S REPUTATION rests above all on his leadership in the Second World War, often described as Britain's 'finest hour'. Yet Churchill himself coined that phrase. It serves to remind us that he not only made history but also wrote it:...
Counting the Costs
ON JANUARY 27TH, it is sixty years since the largest Nazi death camp at Auschwitz was liberated by the Red Army. Ever since, the world has reeled at the enormity of what took place there, and by the ghastly, unimaginable, arithmetic of murder in its...
Death of Tamerlane: February 18th, 1405
IN JANUARY THE Scourge of God caught a cold. One of history's most brutal butchers, now perhaps in his seventies, had set out with an army 200,000 strong from Samarqand, his capital, to try conclusions with the Chinese Empire, 3,000 miles away. It...
Floating Palaces: Ocean Liners as Icons of Modern Splendour: Bernhard Rieger Considers How Luxury Liners Became Icons of Modernity and National Pride in the Early Decades of the Twentieth Century
A civilisation is known by its realised dreams. If another age than ours should ask, 'What did you do with your time?' here, in the more than Roman magnificence of our engineering, is one answer we Call give.' IT WAS THE NEW LINER Queen Mary, awaiting...
John Hunter and the Anatomy of a Museum: Simon Chaplin Describes the Extraordinary Personal Museum of the 18th-Century Anatomist and Gentleman-Dissector John Hunter, and Suggests That This, and Others like It, Played a Critical Role in Establishing an Acceptable View of Dissection
IN FEBRUARY 2005, the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons of England re-opens to the public alter a two-year closure for refurbishment. At the heart of the museum lies an extraordinary collection of over 3,500 anatomical and pathological...
Laurence Rees: In His Latest Article about Today's Historians, Daniel Snowman Meets the Creator of Some of the Finest TV History Programmes, Including Auschwitz, Currently Being Shown on BBC2
IS THIS THE MAN who launched a thousand Hitler programmes? Well, no, actually, and Laurence Rees confesses to being a little tired of being labelled the forts et origo of the supposed 'Hitler Wave' on television. For a start, he says, there isn't a...
Lord Palmerston Becomes PM: February 5th, 1855
HENRY TEMPLE, third Viscount Palmerston, was seventy when he became prime minister, which he remained with only a short break until his death in 1865,just before his eighty-first birthday. With the morals of a Regency buck, both a Tory and a Whig in...
Managing 'Civilian Deaths Due to War Operations': Julie Rugg Reports on Recent Research Done into Official Attitudes towards Burial during the Blitz
WITH A EUROPEAN WAR IMMINENT, on February 28th, 1939, the Ministry of Health published Circular 1779 to all local authorities with responsibility for implementing Air Raid Precaution (ARP) measures. The Circular alerted them to set in train a strategy...
Mengele and the Family of Dwarfs: Yehuda Koren Tells One Family's Remarkable Story of Surviving Auschwitz
UNDER THE 'FINAL SOLUTION', entire Jewish communities, extended families of forty or fifty members were crammed in cattle cars and transported to Nazi death camps. Almost nine out of ten people who arrived at Auschwitz-Birkenau were sent directly to...
Studying in Depth: Our Annual Survey of the Range of Options Available to Those Wanting to Pursue Their Historical Studies at Postgraduate Level
IF YOU HAVE RECENTLY FINISHED your first degree course and want to look at history in a little more depth, or perhaps want to go back to proper studying after a break of several years, what will you do and where will you do it? Your local branch of...
The Churchill Museum: Phil Reed, Director of the New Churchill Museum, Gives a Personal Insight into the Development of the New Museum Housed in the Cabinet War Rooms, Which Opens to the Public This Month
THE CHURCHILL MUSEUM is the first major museum in the world to be solely devoted to the life and legacy of Sir Winston Churchill. It is the fruition of a project costing a total of 14 million [pounds sterling], that has extended and opened to the public...
The Diet of Augsburg: February 2nd, 1555
THE IMPERIAL diet, or conference, which assembled in the Bavarian city of Augsburg that February marked a significant stage in the history of both the Reformation and Germany. The Holy Roman Empire was being torn to pieces by the mutual antagonism,...
The Flight of the Falcon: Rhoads Murphey Reflects on a Thousand Years of Turkic Cultural Development
IS ART THE REFLECTION of society and its values, the tastes and personal ambitions of rich patrons, or the artistic creativity of the artist transcending both the conventions of society and the constraints of patronage? Confronted by the Royal Academy's...
The Invitation That Never Came: Mary Seacole after the Crimea: Helen Rappaport on Queen Victoria, Florence Nightingale and the Post-Crimean War Reputation of the Woman Recently Voted 'Greatest Black Briton': Mary Seacole
IN THE SUMMER OF 1856, after the last British troops had made their weary journey home from the Crimea at the end of hostilities, there were numerous public celebrations to mark the end of what had been a bitter and difficult campaign. Among those...
The Other Side of Colditz: Judy Urquhart Recalls a Forgotten Use of Colditz Castle after the End of the Second World War-As a Prison for German Aristocrats
COLDITZ CASTLE WAS ONCE THE PRESERVE of the Electors of Saxony; then it became a mental home before being used as a prison camp in the Second World War. But the 'fortress rock' was not only used to incarcerate Allied prisoners of war. They were liberated...

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