History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 43, December

Amsterdam and William III
Without the economic muscle of the Netherlands' largest city, William III would never have been able to stage Britain's 'Glorious Revolution' or urge European war against Louis XIM. But his relationship with Amsterdam's burghers was far from smooth,...
Barley Hall's Historic Harvest
Barley Hall, a medieval town house in the heart of York, is coming to life. By the end of the year, the Great Hall, Parlour and Buttery will be furnished as authentically as historians' interpretation allows. The York Archaeological Trust are continuing...
Dickens and the Construction of Christmas
One hundred and fifty years ago, in October 1843, Charles Dickens began the writing of one of his most popular and bestloved books, A Christmas Carol. It was written in six weeks and finished by the end of November, being fitted in in the intervals...
History on the Doorstep
Mary Cosh, whose The Squares of lslington: Part II has just appeared, is now widely regarded as the Islington historian. Yet when, a Bristolian by birth, she first came to London, she lived in Notting Hill and little dreamt that, north and east of...
Interfacing Smual Hartlib
Britain' s first information scientist? Mark Greengrass tells the story of a remarkable 17th century polymath and of the modern enterprise to re-categorise and evaluate, with the aid of the modern computer, his archive of knowledge. Two famous English...
Local History on the Council Agenda
As a member of the working party planning 'Heritage Day in Historic Lincolnshire' I have become aware of the delicate relationships existing between local government, heritage, and tourism, not to mention educational bodies providing classes in local...
Royal Rations
In November 1992 HM the Queen described the 40th anniversary of her accession as an 'annus horribilis' and 'not a year I shall look back on with undiluted pleasure'. Compared with the early 1950s and the high hopes of a new Elizabethan age, which can...
Sir Peter Quennell, 1905-1993: An Appreciation
Peter Quennell and Alan Hodge were joint editors of History Today for the remarkable duration of twenty-nine years from 1951 until 1979. In November 1979, shortly after Alan's death, the journal published a tribute to their editorship. It had been...
The Great Copper Trials
Townsmen and farmers have seldom been allies, and never less so than in nineteenth-century Britain. Rapid industrial and commercial growth tipped economic and political balances in favour of the towns, and the unregulated physical growth of the latter...
The Mandate for Yap
The story of the small Pacific island of Yap shows the rather rough interface between Britain and America in a work-a-day world. Divergent interests between nations are quite natural, and, indeed, if they did not occur, there would be a much reduced...
The Maritime Trust
Poets from Shakespeare to Masefield and popular songs from 'Rule Britannia' and 'Hearts of Oak' to 'All the Nice Girls Love a Sailor' attest to the place which ships and seamen hold in British affections and the long, intense relationship between Britain...
The Other St. Margaret
The year-long celebrations for the 900th anniversary of the death of St Margaret have reawakened interest in the life and legacy of Scotland's saintly queen. The reverent commemorative events across Scotland have provided ample proof- if further proof...
Wahgi Meets West
In popular romantic myth, primitive societies are generally held to be centres of paradise incompatible with their corrupted civilised neighbours. The 'noble savage' (in reality usually more savage than noble) is thought either to face extermination...
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