History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 60, No. 8, August

All Contributions Welcome: The Enormous Growth in User-Generated Content Made Possible by Such Developments as the Wiki, Presents Exciting Opportunities as Well as Potential Perils for Historians
User-generated content is a term that was first popularised in 2005, when websites began to offer users a chance to create material for publication online. It can refer to anything created by visitors to a website, from a short review posted on Amazon...
An Inspector Calls: Rosie Llewellyn-Jones Recalls the Victorian Economist Who Helped Resolve the Financial Crisis in India after the Mutiny of 1857
The monetary cost to Britain of putting down the Indian Mutiny was estimated at around 42 million [pounds sterling], an enormous sum for a conflict that lasted little over a year. It was not only the upfront expense of importing extra ammunition, paying...
A Novel for Hysterical Times: Wilkie Collins' Haunting Mystery of False Identity and Female Instability Reflected One of the Lunacy Panics of the Age. Sarah Wise Looks at Three Events That Inspired the Woman in White Published 150 Years Ago This Month
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] I had now arrived at that particular point of my walk where four roads met--the road to Hampstead, the road to Finchley, the road to West End, and the road back to London. I had mechanically turned...
A Path to Peace Inspired by the Past: A Solution to the Turmoil in the Middle East Seems as Far Away as Ever. but, Says Martin Gilbert, Past Relations between Muslims and Jews Have Often Been Harmonious and Can Be So Again
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Enmity between Jews and Muslims seems to be a fact of life in the 21st century: a hostility that impinges on Jewish and Muslim life worldwide and, in particular, on the Arab-Israeli conflict, now in its sixth decade. When...
A Tapestry of England's Past: Sarah Gristwood on the Complex Issues Raised by the Restoration of a Remarkable Tudor Vision of Victory over the Spanish Armada
The recreation of the Armada Tapestries, now on display in the House of Lords, could hardly be more timely, in a number of different ways. The original series of 10 tapestries was commissioned in the 1590s by Howard of Effingham, Lord High Admiral...
A Tsar Is Born: Following an Invitation to Help Advise the Government on the School History Curriculum, What Can a High-Profile 'Telly Don' like Niall Ferguson Bring to the Classroom? Sean Lang Wonders
It has got to be any historian's dream: to be dubbed 'the history tsar' in the press and be asked to help draw up the history curriculum for schools in England. Who could begrudge Niall Ferguson a sense of triumph after Michael Gove, the new education...
Changing Ends: As the England Criket Team Takes on Pakistan in This Summer's Test Match Series, Mike Marqusee Revisits S.M. Toyne's Article on the Origins and Growth of the Game, First Published in History Today in June 1955
When S.M. Toyne's article first appeared, domestic and international cricket was still directly governed by the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), a self-perpetuating private members' dub. The division between 'gentlemen' (public school educated 'amateurs')...
Chatham House and the Lessons of History: The Royal Institute of International Affairs, Better Known as Chatham House, Celebrates Its 90th Birthday This Summer. Roger Morgan Looks at the Organisation's Original Aims and Its Pioneering Role in the Study of Contemporary History
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In May 1919 a number of British and American historians found themselves in Paris, in and around the foreign ministry at the Quai d'Orsay, with long stretches of time on their hands. Harold Temperley and James Butler from...
Dr Trelawney's Cabinet of Historical Curiosities: This Month's Subject: Babies
Youthful Conservative MP Lord George Hamilton (1845-1927) successfully contested the parliamentary seat of Middlesex when only 22 years old. His party leader, Benjamin Disraeli, sent Hamilton off with the encouraging words: 'All right, little David,...
From the Editor
One of the greatest achievements seen in the second half of the 20th century has been the creation and development of the Federal Republic of Germany. In less than a human lifespan Germany has pulled itself out of a material and moral abyss that few...
Henry Hudson Sails into Hudson Bay: August 3rd, 1610
Henry Hudson's fame seems to be in inverse proportion to his achievements, perhaps because of his tragic end. He never found the Northwest Passage and he discovered few, if any, of the places subsequently named after him, perhaps not even Hudson Bay....
Heroes of Science
Certain British heroes seem to have organised their lives around memorable dates. Can it be coincidence that William Shakespeare was not only born on April 23rd, St George's Day, but died then too? Conveniently for posterity, Charles Darwin waited...
James II of Scots Killed at Roxburgh: August 3rd, 1460
Known as 'James of the fiery face' for the bright red birthmark that covered a whole side of his countenance, James II was one of the most forceful of the Stewart rulers. Just six when his father James I was murdered in 1437, all through his childhood...
Living a Lie: Almost Everything Written about and by Kim Philby Is Wrong, Claims Boris Volodarsky. the Soviet Spy and His KGB Masters Sought to Exaggerate His Successes against the West, Beginning with the Fictions That Surround Philby's First Mission during the Spanish Civil War
On October 1st, 1967 The Sunday Times front page bore the headline 'I Spied for Russia From 1933'. A large black and white photo (right) showed a man, standing in Red Square, in an open-necked shirt, in front of the Kremlin. The editor of The Sunday...
Rome 1960: Making Sporting History: The Modern Olympic Movement Was Inspired by the Classical World. but, Says Richard Bosworth, When the Italian Capital Hosted the Games 50 Years Ago, the Organisers Had to Offer an Image of the City That Also Took Account of Its Christian, Renaissance and Fascist Pasts
These days, contests between nations are more likely to occur in the sports arena than on the battlefield, with successive Olympic Games offering the greatest opportunity for what has been called national 'sellebration': the ready marketing of a soft...
The Accidental Atomicist: Shortly before His Death Earlier This Year, Hyman Frankel, the Last Surviving Member of the Team Whose Work Led to the Development of the Atom Bomb, Talked to Maureen Paton about Why He Decided Not to Join the Manhattan Project
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In early 1941 Hyman Frankel's life changed overnight when the physics student and member of the Young Communists was handpicked to join a team of scientists working on a secret British nuclear project, codenamed Tube Alloys,...
The Lure of the Orient: At the Height of the Roman Empire, Hundreds of Merchant Ships Left Egypt Every Year to Voyage through the Red Sea into the Indian Ocean, Exchanging the Produce of the Mediterranean for Exotic Eastern Commodities. Raoul McLaughlin Traces Their Pioneering Journeys
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Eastern trade has a long history. Exotic goods were brought through the Red Sea over a thousand years before the Roman conquest of Egypt. Hieroglyphic texts reveal how in the third millennium BC the pharaohs brought incenses...
The Medieval Pacifist: During the Anglo-French Conflicts That Characterised the 14th Century, the Oxford Theologian John Wyclif Challenged the 'Un-Christian' Pursuit of War and Wealth. Yet, Just like Anti-War Protesters Today, Wyclif Had Little Influence on Parliament or the King
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] War and human society are familiar acquaintances and for at least 2,500 years, since Plato was writing in the Athenian Academy, intellectuals have debated the justice and injustice of armed conflict. The most famous military...
The Visigoths Sack Rome: August 25th, 410
At its height the Roman Empire stretched from Britain and the Atlantic to North Africa and Mesopotamia. In the fourth century An, however, what Pliny the Elder had called the 'immense majesty of the Roman peace' was menaced by invasions of Germanic...
Wroclaw's Concrete Controversy: A Project to Restore One of the Polish City's 20th-Century Monuments Has Turned into a Cultural Battleground
A modernist architectural icon is causing a stir in Poland, nearly a century after it was built. The Hala Stulecia (or Centennial Hall) was constructed in 1913 in the German city of Breslau (now Wroclaw in Poland) by the architect Max Berg. Though...
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