History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 46, No. 2, February

Charlemagne in Italy
Charlemagne's conduct towards the vanquished Lombards was, on the whole, generous and statesmanlike. By assuming the title of king of the Lombards he showed that it was not his object to destroy the nationality of the countrymen of Alboin, nor to force...
Fenimore Cooper's America
Twentieth-century readers know the American novelist James Fenimore Cooper as the author of the five `Leatherstocking Tales', including The Last of the Mohicans, set in the North American forest and prairie during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth...
Fighting Knights and Sirens: The Cloister, Monreale
The Sicilian town of Monreale boasts today a splendid cathedral founded in the 1170s as a testament to the religious zeal of Sicily's Norman king - William II. The conquest of an island of mixed Greek, Arab and Latin peoples by the Normans produced an...
Masculinity, Men's Bodies and the Great War
Less than ten years ago, the words `gender history' were interchangeable with `women's history'. Not any more. Thanks to the efforts of a wide range of scholars engaged in mapping out a distinctive narrative concerning masculinity, `gender' has become...
Re-Arming Venus
A seventeen tonne marble sculpture, the `Spirit of Liverpool', is the first exhibit visitors will see at the city's new 7.2 million [pounds] arts Conservation Centre when it opens this month and work begins (visitors will be allowed in later in the year)....
Scottish Architects in Tsarist Russia
When the Scots architect William Hastie (1755-1832) designed the so-called Contract House in Kiev in 1815 he was not just carrying out one more commission in his role as head of Tsar Alexander I's town planning service but was involved in creating the...
The Bass Museum
It was water which made Burton upon Trent the brewing capital of England. The monks of Burton Abbey, Staffordshire's leading medieval monastery, sapiently discovered the admirable effects of the local water, rising up through gypsum beds, on the quality...
The British Empire
I would like to begin by referring to the famous passage in the autobiography of Edward Gibbon: It was at Rome on the fifteenth of October 1764, as I sat musing among the ruins of the Capitol, while the bare-footed friars were singing vespers in the...
The First Metropolis?
For the next few years, the eyes of archaeologists and art historians all over the world will be turned towards what is being heralded as `the dig of the millennium' currently underway in Turkey. Catalhoyuk, near Konya in southern Turkey, is the oldest...
Tomorrow's History Today? Post-Modern Collecting
`Own a piece of history', proclaimed The Badge Shop in London's West End in the early 1980s. "To buy in', as it were, to the past by owning a piece of its material remains, in this case old promotional badges, has a more powerful hold on people than...

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