History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 61, No. 4, April

A Huntsman's Home: Richard Almond Describes How Some Rare Wall Paintings Help Shed Light on Medieval Hunting
Hunting was an almost universal activity in the later Middle Ages. It provided food and raw materials for the common people and, for the ruling class, food, sport, exercise and a positive outlet for aggressive tendencies. Social status prescribed who...
A Sentimental Education: James Boswell, Samuel Johnson's Future Biographer, Found Glasgow a Dull Place. Yet It Was at the City's University That He Came into Contact with the Political Economist Adam Smith, Whose Insights Forced the Student to Grapple with Competing Claims on His Conscience, as Robert Zaretsky Explains
In October 1759 James Boswell (1740-95) half-stepped, half-collapsed from the coach that had just plied a 12-hour journey over rutted roads from his hometown of Edinburgh to Glasgow. The city's centre, known as the Trongate, was impressive: the English...
Beauty and Civilisation: As a Major New Exhibition on the Aesthetic Movement Opens at the Victoria and Albert Museum, Richard Cavendish Explores Bedford Park, the Garden Suburb Inspired by the Movement's Ideals and Charlotte Crow Previews the Display
An estate agent's advertisement for Bedford Park in its early days called it 'the healthiest place in the world', with an annual death rate below six per 1,000 and houses equipped with 'the most approved Sanitary arrangements'. The man behind England's...
'Charlie Will Come Again': Jacqueline Riding Examines How a 19th-Century Painting, Created Almost 150 Years after the Jacobite Defeat at Culloden, Has Come to Dominate the Iconography of That Event
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The second Jacobite Rebellion of 1745-46 is an important turning point in British history. Yet despite decades of re-evaluation and scholarship the event remains, among the wider public, the legend of 'Bonnie Prince Charlie'...
Dr Trelawney's Cabinet of Historical Curiosities: This Month's Subject: Tears
James Salter (d. 1728), known as 'Don Saltero', owned a coffee house in Chelsea famous for its collection of curiosities which included William the Conqueror's flaming sword, Henry VIII's mailcoat and a necklace said to be made from Job's tears. ...
Eats Roots and Leaves: The Quest for Spiritual Virtue through Personal Austerity Drove Many Eastern Christians to Lead Solitary Lives as Hermits Surviving in the Wilderness. Andrew Jotischky Describes How Indifference to Food Became an Integral Part of the Monastic Ideal in the Byzantine Era, One Revived in the West in the 11th and 12th Centuries
The world's best restaurant, according to Restaurant Magazine, is Noma in Copenhagen. Its head chef, Rene Redzepi, has made his name from serving dishes that include the apparently inedible--lichen, moss, obscure molluscs and even 'edible soil' feature...
England's Ruritania: As the Marriage of Prince William and Kate Middleton Approaches Michael Bloch Tells the Story of One of the More Unusual Dynasties Related to the Windsors
Of all the European royal houses from which Prince William is descended few were more colourful than that of Mecklenburg-Strelitz: William's five-times great-grandmother was Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, who in 1761 became the queen of George...
From the Editor
Berlin is a fascinating city for anyone with an interest in history, a view confirmed by a recent visit there after a long gap. The fount of much of the worst of the 20th century and, in 1989, witness to one of its most stirring events, Berlin has,...
'I Really Do Not See the Signal': April 2nd 1801
On land Horatio Nelson could seem amiably ineffectual. At sea he was a tiger who loved battles because he was brilliant at winning them. On that day in 1801 Vice-Admiral Nelson led the British van against a Danish fleet (with Norwegian support) anchored...
King Farouk's Succession in Egypt: April 28th 1936
Succeeding his father King Fuad at the age of 16 Farouk was formally crowned in Cairo the following year as King of Egypt and of Sudan, Sovereign of Nubia, of Kordofan and of Darfur. In a complete break with tradition he went on the radio to speak...
Marriages Divorced from Reality: Jenifer Roberts Looks at the Series of 18th-Century Weddings Which Led the Portuguese Royal Family into Dynastic Crisis
Enriched by the gold and diamond mines of Brazil, Lisbon in the early 18th century was one of the richest and most opulent cities in Europe. Every year treasure fleets arrived with cargoes of predous stones and metals, wealth used by King Joao V (r....
Reflections of Empire: Glittering Monument to Britain's Colonial Achievement or Fragile Symbol of a Fragmenting Imperial Dream? Jan Piggott Charts the Efforts to Make Joseph Paxton's Crystal Palace Flourish as an 'Acropolis of Empire'
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In November 1911 the Crystal Palace at Sydenham, the world's largest building, was for sale, bankrupt after decades of financial troubles. The Crystal Palace Company declared with a heavy pun in their Sale Catalogue that:...
Round & About: April 2011
For the latest updates on events and exhibitions, visit www.historytoday.com/events Learning to Dwell: Adolf Loos in the Czech Lands Until May 3rd Royal Institute of British Architects 66 Portland Place London W1B 1AD Telephone: 020...
Sana'a: City of the Book: Since Its Discovery in Yemen in 1972 a Collection of Brittle Documents, Believed to Be among the Earliest Koranic Texts, Has Been the Subject of Fierce and Divisive Debate among Scholars of Islamic History
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] From the outside Yemen's House of Manuscripts Flooks more like a jail than a library. Built in the early 1980s to house Yemen's vast collection of medieval Islamic writing, the boxy structure stands...
St Catherine of Siena Canonised: April 29th 1461
The saint's family home can still be seen in Siena. Her father, a comfortably off dyer called Giacomo di Benincasa, had already had 22 children when she was born, with a twin sister who did not survive. The generally accepted date is 1347. Catherine...
The Cult of Beauty: The Aesthetic Movement 1860-1900
The Cult of Beauty: The Aesthetic Movement 1860-1900 April 2nd--July 17th, 2011 Victoria & Albert Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 2RL Telephone 020 7942 2000 www.vam.ac.uk [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The Aesthetic Movement describes...
The Democratic Delusion: Much Western Commentary on the Turmoil in the Arab World Demonstrates Historical Ignorance
Democracy is back in fashion. Oppressed people in the Muslim world are out in the streets demanding it and western observers are cheering them on. The only problem is that these two civilisations have totally different understandings of what democracy...
The History of Medicine as the History of Pain
Modern day obituaries often speak of illnesses 'bravely fought" but the history of pain, a defining and constant experience in lives throughout history, lacks a substantial literature, argues Joanna Bourke. Yet its expression is culturally determined...
The Power Behind the Throne: Stephen Alford Admires a Perceptive Article on Lord Burghley, Elizabeth I's Ally and Consummate Political Fixer, by the Distinguished Tudor Historian Joel Hurstfield, First Published in History Today in 1956
Joel Hurstfield's pen portrait of William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley (1520-98) appeared in History Today in December 1956. A year earlier the American scholar Conyers Read had published the opening volume of his biography of Lord Burghley (a second...
Waves of Revolution: In the Light of Current Events in North Africa and the Middle East, David Motadel Examines the Increasing Speed of Popular Rebellions around the World
The Arab revolts have come in waves. Beginning in Tunisia, unrest spread across Egypt, Libya, Algeria, Morocco, Jordan, Bahrain, Oman and Yemen within weeks. Chants against autocratic rule echo beyond the Arab world, in Iran and China. Dictators between...
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