History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 56, No. 4, April

April's Anniversaries
Birth of Isambard Kingdom Brunel April 9th, 1806 THE GREATEST OF THE GREAT VICTORIAN engineers, and their most outstanding personality, was born at five minutes before one o'clock in the morning in a small house in the district of Portsea in...
Bikinis and Breastplates: Richard Vinen Ponders the Political Significance of Two of France's Most Potent Female Icons and Finds There Is More to Them Than Meets the Eye
JOAN OF ARC, THE SAINT, WAS BORN TO A PEASANT FAMILY in Lorraine, eastern France, in 1412. At the age of fifteen she heard the voices of St Michael, St Catherine and St Margaret urging her to free France from the English and to see that the dauphin,...
History and Histrionics
SOME OF THE DEBATES currently raising issues of interest to historians are taking place not in seminar rooms or lecture halls, but in law courts. How seriously we should take them, though, is an open question. On the one hand we have David Irving telling...
Hooke's Book; Michael Hunter, an Authority on the Natural Philosopher Robert Hooke, Describes His Excitement at the Recent Discovery of an Unknown Manuscript in Hooke's Hand. He Explains Its Significance and Why Every Effort Should Be Made to Keep It in Britain
ROBERT HOOKE'S STAR is currently in the ascendant. The latest book on this scientist and polymath, which came out in March, is the seventh such work to be published in little more than three years. At last, Hooke is receiving the attention he deserves...
Reel Britannia: Linda Kaye Describes a Project to Make Accessible to the Public the History of a Series of 'Cinemagazines' Made by the Government in the 1950s and 60s to Promote Britain Overseas
FOR DECADES BRITISH TAXPAYERS have been paying the government to make films about themselves for overseas distribution that they have never seen. All this is about to change. To mark the sixtieth anniversary of the Central Office of Information (COI),...
Round and About: April 2006
Soane's Magician: The Tragic Genius of Joseph Michael Gandy March 31st to August 12th Sir John Soane Museum, 13 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3BP Tel: 020 7440 4246 For over thirty years, Gandy an unsuccessful architect himself (1771--1843)...
'Soldiers Are We': The Easter Rising Took Place in Dublin Ninety Years Ago This Month. Charles Townshend Has Read Hundreds of 'Witness Statements' from the Men and Women Who Took Part, Made Available to the Public in 2003 after Decades in a Government Vault
SOLDIERS ARE WE, WHOSE LIVES ARE PLEDGED TO IRELAND'--the stirring first lines of what was eventually to become the national anthem of the Irish Republic--were heard publicly for the first time in 1915. The composer of the 'Soldier's Song', Peadar...
Some Talk of Alexander: Frederic Raphael Explains How the Isles of Greece, and the Rest of the Classical World, Caught His Imagination
It's ONE THING TO GET A SENSE OF BEING IN HISTORY; another to imagine being any kind of historian. My earliest years, until I was almost seven years old, were somewhat arcadian, though New York City in the 1930s was scarcely a pastoral paradise. I...
The Art of Lese Majeste
FROM THE BEGINNING of Victoria's reign until the 1960s, political cartoonists and caricaturists in Britain were remarkably respectful towards the royal family. Indeed Punch (founded in 1841) rarely even published cartoons featuring the monarch. Gone...
The Dirty A-Word: Peter Neville Says That Bush and Blair Failed to Draw the Proper Lessons from Munich 1938 When They Raised the Spectre of Chamberlain and Appeasement to Justify Their War against Saddam
ON SEPTEMBER 30TH, 1938, Neville Chamberlain signed the Munich Agreement that gave Germany the Czech Sudetenland. The next morning he also persuaded Adolf Hitler to sign the Anglo-German Declaration (now on view in the Imperial War Museum) that supposedly...
The Gambia: Graham Gendall Norton Introduces an Accessible but Exotic Land Which Has Long Been a Cultural Crossroads
THERE IS NOWHERE QUITE LIKE THE GAMBIA. This small West African country of only 1.3 million inhabitants is completely surrounded by Senegal, and cradles the mouth and 200 miles of lower reaches of one of Africa's great rivers, from which the country...
Timeline
July 31st 1913. Dublin riot following warrant for arrest of James Larkin, whose organization of a strike on the trams had provoked employers into a general lock-out. 400 injured. April 25th 1914. Ulster Volunteer Force landed 24,600 rifles and 3...
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