History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 56, No. 1, January

A Great Commander, and a Bit of a Lad: Historian June Purvis Gives Her Very Personal Reflections on Attending the Ceremonies on HMS Victory on Trafalgar Day 2005
BRITAIN IN OCTOBER 2005 was gripped by Nelson fever, with some 6,000 events taking place to commemorate the bicentenary of the Battle of Trafalgar. On October 21st, 1805, Admiral Lord Nelson had won a stunning victory over the combined French and Spanish...
A History for England: Confusion between English and British History Goes Back a Long Way, as Alan MacColl Reveals
IN 1154 THE MONKS of Peterborough Abbey made the final entries in what was, so far as we know, the last active version of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. The main events they recorded were the death of King Stephen, the accession of Henry II, the death...
A Liberal Party Landslide: January 12th, 1906
THE ELECTION RESULT ASTOUNDED winners and losers alike. In 1900, the Conservatives and Unionists had won 402 seats on the strength of success in the Boer War. The Liberals had 184 seats, with 82 Irish Nationalists and two Labour Party members. The...
Alien Attitudes? Gavin Schaffer Argues That the British Have Always Been Ambivalent in Their Attitude towards Refugees, Especially at Times of War
In the summer of 2005 the Daily Mail gave over its front page to a robust criticism of the British government's plans to force the deportation of failed Zimbabwean asylum seekers. Under the headline 'For pity's sake let them stay', it attacked 'the...
An Unsung Villain: The Reputation of a Condottiere: Stephen Cooper Describes How John Hawkwood, a Tanner's Son from Essex, Became a Mercenary in Late Fourteenth-Century Italy, and after His Death Acquired a Reputation as a First-Class General and as a Model of Chivalry
IF YOU GO INTO THE DUOMO in Florence, you will see a splendid equestrian portrait of the Englishman Sir John Hawkwood (d.1394). It was painted by Paolo Uccello in 1436 and shows Hawkwood as Captain-General of Florence, the position he held in the early...
Ascending the Greasy Walpole
This series of articles on some of Britain's parliamentarians--distinguished or lobby-fodder, worthy or base--comes to an end with a look at the early career of Britain's first prime minister, and reminds us (as if we could ever forget it) that not...
Charles v's Spanish Abdiction: January 16th, 1556
IN THEORY, CHARLES V was the most powerful monarch in Europe. A Habsburg, in his teens in 1516 he inherited Spain, which had been united by his grandparents Ferdinand and Isabella. In 1519 he succeded his paternal grandfather Maximilian I as Holy Roman...
Cold Case from the Film Archives: Film Historian Thomas Doherty Does Some Detective Work on a Mystery from the 1930s, When the Hollywood Studios Had to Deal with the Upsurge of Racism in Hitler's Germany
FOR FORENSIC DETECTIVES willing to dirty their white gloves, even the coldest case can yield secrets that expose the perpetrator of a crime. For the film historian--whose white gloves may only get smudged in a motion-picture archive--the work of sifting...
Documentary and History on Film: Brian Winston Looks Back at Some of the Ways in Which History Has Been Presented on the Screen, and Sees the Documentary Based on Archival Footage as Intrinsic to Its Success
BEING A WOMAN, a revolutionary Communist and a mere film editor are considerable obstacles to establishing a rightful place in the twentieth-century cinema's pantheon of great film-makers, as a comparison of the career and subsequent reputation of...
Film of the Year: Auschwitz: History Today and the Grierson Trust Have Together Awarded Their Annual Historical Film Prize to the Powerful BBC Series Auschwitz: The Nazis and the 'Final Solution'. Juliet Gardiner Explains Why; and on the Following Pages Two Historians of the Documentary and Feature Film Industries Reveal Aspects of Their Subjects
JOHN GRIERSON (1898-1972) is usually described as the 'father' of the British documentary film movement. He described his offspring as being 'the creative treatment of reality', and his first excursion into the genre was Drifters (1929), a naturalistic...
Florence Nightingale as a Social Reformer: Lynn McDonald Describes the Lasting Impact of Florence Nightingale on Improving Public Health for the Poor
FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE (1820-1910), the heroine of the Crimean War, is still best known as the major founder of the modern profession of nursing and as a hospital reformer. Yet her broader contribution to public health care and social reform--notably...
It Started with a Kiss: David Culbert Visits an Exhibition at the Allied (Alliierten) Museum in the Former Headquarters of the US Occupation Forces in Berlin
THE ALLIED MUSEUM, is located on Clayallee, named after the US military governor of Germany from 1947-49, Lucius D. Clay, across from what was the official entrance to the Headquarters for American Occupation Forces in Berlin. The museum, which opened...
January's Anniversaries
The Birth of Mozart January 27th, 1756 STARTING LIFE WITH AN AMPLE SUPPLY of both genius and Christian names, Joannes Chrisostomus Wolfgang Gottlieb Mozart was born at eight in the evening in his family's third-floor apartment at 9 Getreidegasse...
More about the Mask: Roger Macdonald's Article 'Behind the Iron Mask' Published in Our November 2005 Issue Raised a Number of Questions. Here He Answers Some of Them, and Reveals More Extraordinary Facts
WHY DID You give away the secret that d'Artagnan became the Man in the Iron Mask instead of allowing people who bought your book to find out for themselves? Originally I just intended to write a cliff-hanger for History Today about the real Musketeers...
Overdue for a Visit ... Ben Power Takes a Tour of the London Library, an Invaluable Resource for Historians and History Today, and Describes Plans for a Sensitive Expansion Beginning This Year
WHEN CHARLES DICKENS DECIDED TO WRITE a novel set during the French Revolution, his first act was to send a message to Thomas Carlyle. Dickens asked his friend (an expert in the field) to furnish him with a selection of volumes on the period. Carlyle...
Reconstructing the American South-After Katrina; Jim Downs Finds That the Reasons the Federal Government Was Slow to Respond to Hurricane Katrina Are Rooted in the South's Racial and Economic History, and Wonders If the Catastrophe May Lead at Last to Genuine Reconstruction
THE CHAOS THAT STRUCK THE GULF COAST in the aftermath of the 2005 hurricane season has created a stir among American historians. Some have looked back to the trail of devastation left by other major hurricanes in the twentieth century, and have even...
Round and About: January 2006
The Last Goodbye: The Rescue of Children from Nazi Europe Until February 16th The Jewish Museum Raymond Burton House 129-131 Albert Street, London NWI 7NB Tel: 0207 284 1997 www.jewishmuseum.org.uk The remarkable story of the last goodbye...
Small-Screen Star
DO WE SEE TOO MUCH OF HITLER on television? Simon Schama has just become the latest in a long line to tell us we do, asserting that film-makers are being cautious and unimaginative by sticking to well-worn twentieth-century subjects, and the Second...
Spying for Germany in Vichy France: Simon Kitson Explores the Prevalence of Spying for and against the Nazis in Southern France after the German Invasion
IT IS OFTEN ASSUMED that relations between the German victors and the Vichy regime, established after the fall of France in May 1940, operated without a hitch. There is no doubt that the collaboration of the Vichy government was crucial. It gave the...
The Man Who Hated Caricature: Cartoon Historian Mark Bryant Examines the Origins of Caricature Itself, and the Ambivalent Attitude to It of the Man Whose Name Has Become Synonymous with the Emergence of the Art in Britain
IN BRITAIN WE LIKE TO THINK that William Hogarth was the father of caricature and cartoons. His 1763 grotesque portrait of John Wilkes is seen as a classic of its kind, and his series of 'modern moral subjects' lampooning the follies and vice of his...

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