History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 58, No. 10, October

A War Cartoonist at the Foreign Office: Mark Bryant Examines the Wartime Work of Osbert Lancaster, the Centenary of Whose Birth This Year Is Marked with a New Exhibition at the Wallace Collection, London
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] This year marks the centenary of the birth of Sir Osbert Lancaster CBE (1908-86). Writer, theatre designer, art critic, painter and illustrator, he is nonetheless still probably best known for the single-column topical cartoons--some...
Berlin Airlift Remembered: Patricia Cleveland-Peck Visits Tempelhof Which Is about to Close for Ever as an Airport
Templehof will reach the end of its life as an airport by November. Its tiny duty free shop has already gone, its main restaurant is closed and few footsteps now echo down its long corridors and across its massive passenger hall. The tranquil atmosphere...
Beyond the Dreams of Avarice: Sir John Reeves Ellerman Was No. 1 on the UK's 1916 Rich List. William D. Rubinstein Looks at the Careers of This Reclusive, but Fabulously Rich, British Man of Business and of His Children
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] One of the more interesting changes in popular social analysis in Britain over the past generation has been the growth of 'Rich Lists', listings of the richest men and women of the past and present. Many will be surprised...
Caught on the Hop: The Yom Kippur War: Elizabeth Stephens Examines How Thirty-Five Years Ago This Month the Surprise Invasion of Israel by Egypt and Its Allies Started the Process That Led to Camp David
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The impact of the Yom Kippur War that erupted on October 6th, 1973, far outweighed its relatively short duration of twenty days of heavy fighting. It severely tested the detente between the United States and the Soviet Union...
Cold Comfort? to Coincide with 'Cold War Modern', a Major New Exhibition at the V & A in London, Its Consultant Curator, David Crowley of the Royal College of Art, Looks Back on the 1959 Kennedy-Khrushchev 'Kitchen Debate' and Explores How Modern Design Became an Active Part of That War
The Cold War was fought on many fronts. It was contested in space, with the Soviet Union and the United States competing in the race to send satellites into orbit and men to cast their shadows on the dusty surface of the Moon. Olympic stadiums and...
Could Try Harder? A.D. Harvey Thinks the World of Academe Is Letting Down the Thousands Who Make Black History Month Such a Popular Success Each Year
October is Black History Month. At a time when serious interest in history--as distinct from rubbish like The Da Vinci Code--is at an epochal low, one section of the community at least is committed to investigating and celebrating the story of where...
En Hommage a De Gaulle: France Opens Its First Museum to the General
Colombey-les-deux-Eglises is a small village in the Champagne-Ardenne region, where Charles de Gaulle moved to his family home, 'la Boisserie', in the 1930s and is now buried in the graveyard of the village church. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In 1954,...
Let There Be Light: Illuminating Modern Britain: Pressure in the Nineteenth Century to Introduce Artificial Lighting Was as Much about Enhancing Privacy as about Reducing Crime, According to Chris Otter
The composite image of the world by night, taken from NASA satellites, is one of the emblematic pictures of the early twenty-first century. Viewed from space, much of Europe, North America, India and East Asia blaze with brilliant light. The United...
Masters & Commanders: Andrew Roberts Reflects on the Often Stormy Relationship between Churchill and the Chiefs of Staff during the Second World War, the Subject of His Latest Book
On Tuesday May 26th, 1942, General Sir Alan Brooke, Chief of the Imperial General Staff (CIGS), attended a luncheon at the Soviet Embassy in London to celebrate the signing that day of an Anglo-Soviet twenty-year mutual assistance agreement, six months...
Mathematical Water Magic: An Exotic London Theatre Funded the Building of the First Eddystone Lighthouse. Alison Barnes Has Discovered What Kind of Shows It Staged
Between 1696 and 1720, London's most exciting shows were to be seen at the Mathematical Water Theatre in Piccadilly, where the owner, Henry Winstanley, and his wife Elizabeth put on spectacular water- and fire-work displays. On the day that it opened,...
Oct 15 1858: Last Lincoln V. Douglas Debate
The seven debates between the Democrat US senator for Illinois, Stephen A. Douglas, and his Republican rival for the senate seat, Abraham Lincoln, turned on slavery. Douglas had written the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, which allowed the inhabitants...
Oct 16 1978: Election of John Paul II
The first non-Italian pope to be elected in four centuries, and widely regarded as one of the most memorable, was born Kaarol Jozef Wojtyla in 1920 in a small town in Poland, near Krakow. His mother died in 1929, when he was a schoolboy of eight. His...
Oct 30 1938: Martians Invade New Jersey
The headline in The New York Times was 'Radio Listeners in Panic, Taking War Drama as Fact'. The 'Mercury Theatre of the Air', which was an offshoot of President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal and had a free hour once a week on the CBS radio network,...
Riga: Hansa City at the Baltic Crossroads: Neil Taylor Discusses How Political Change Has Left Its Mark on the Latvian Capital's Town Hall Square
Some cities have an obvious historical centre where architecture and politics have combined to give it this role. Berlin's Schlossplatz and Peking's Tiananmen Square are such places. Events that took place there affected for ever their country's history....
Sirens & Scandals: Today's Obsession with 18th-Century Femmes Fatales Distorts the History of Women
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In The Age of Scandal (1950), T.H. White expounded a mischievous thesis. 'The peak of British culture', he insisted, 'was reached in the latter years of George III ... the rot began to set in with the Romantics ... the apparent...
Taking Liberties: Kathryn Hadley Describes Two Exhibitions on Either Side of the Atlantic That Focus on Themes of Freedom
In the opening speech of his trial in April 1964, Nelson Mandela stated his admiration for the parliamentary systems of western governments and for some of the landmark documents in the fight for British rights: 'The Magna Carta, the Petition of Rights,...
The Historian as Time Traveller: Ian Mortimer, Who Has Been an Archivist and a Poet before Becoming a Medieval Historian and Biographer, Describes Why a Blend of Empathy and Evidence Is the Key to Getting the Most out of History
I was about ten years of age, standing alone in the ruined hall of Grosmont Castle in South Wales. The wind rustled the leaves of the nearby trees as I looked up at the empty space where Maud, mother of the great Duke of Lancaster (who was born in...
The Road to Siberia: Daniel Beer Looks at How Much Soviet Labour Camps Owed to the Theories of Russian Liberals on Crime, Its Causes and How to Treat It
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] After attending the premiere of Lev Tolstofs play The Power of Darkness in 1887, the poet Vladimir Giliarovskii penned a short verse which declared that liberal Russian society was 'imperilled by attacks on two fronts--beneath...
View Modern Art in a New Light
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] PAUL Signac was first seduced by the Cote d'Azur when he moored his yacht in St Tropez during May 1892. His enthusiastic reports attracted other painters, among them Matisse, Bonnard and Dufy, and before long the area was...
Who Invented the Telescope? Nick Pelling Suggests That Credit Should Go Not to the Netherlands but Much Further South to Catalonia
[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED] Four centuries ago this year, stories issued from the Netherlands describing the invention of a twin-lens device for seeing at a distance--the telescope. Though it began its life as no more than a low-power spyglass, it quickly...

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