History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 58, No. 1, January

Banzai! Cartoons of the Great East Asia War: Mark Bryant Looks at the Cartoons Published in Imperial Japan during the Second World War
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In Britain we are accustomed to seeing the Second World War through the eyes of the victorious Allies, especially the English-speaking ones such as Britain, Australia and the USA. This also applies to political cartoons and...
Bergen-Belsen's Information Center: Suzanne Bardgett, Director of the Holocaust Exhibition at the Imperial War Museum, Reports on This Ambitious New Facility Which Opened in October
The camp at Bergen-Belsen will forever be associated with the terrible newsreel reports of its discovery by the British in April 1945--images so horrifying they have come to symbolize the very essence of Nazi evil. This focus has tended to overshadow...
Canada's Forgotten Founder: York Hembery Remembers John by, the Brilliant British Military Engineer Responsible for Building the 175-Year-Old Rideau Canal
Canada's Rideau Canal--opened in 1832 to link Ottawa and Lake Ontario--was recently declared a UNESCO World Heritage site. If there is one man who should have been present, it was John By (1779-1836). A brilliant, but largely forgotten British military...
Editor's Letter
The other day a cousin I rarely see came to lunch, bringing with her the tree of my mother's family which she has been researching; she had managed to get back to the mid-seventeenth century (they were farmers living a few miles south of Bedford)....
Edward II Marries Isabella of France: January 25th, 1308
The second Edward was not the man his father was--or that his son would be either. In 1299, when he was fifteen, he was betrothed to Isabella, daughter of Philip IV of France, but she was only eight and too young for marriage. In 1307 Edward succeeded...
Ekaterinburg: Helen Rappaport Visits the Town on the Russian-Siberian Border Where the Romanovs Met Their End
In 1924 the American dancer Isadora Duncan, down on her luck and past her best, undertook a tour of the Russian provinces. Finding herself in the city of Ekaterinburg in western Siberia, she sent an impassioned plea to her sister to get her out of...
Ethiopia's New Millennium: A.S.H. Smyth Witnesses the First Meskel Festival of Ethiopia's Third Millennium, in the Ancient Capital of Gonder
If New Year festivities are always anticlimactic, then millennium celebrations are the worst. And while the rest of the world celebrated the millennium in January 2000 (or 2001), the new Ethiopian millennium began on September 12th, 2007, initiating...
Fading, Crumbling Images of Soviet History
Leonid Lyubimov spends his days among stacks of film cans at the Sverdlovsk Film Archive he heads in Ekaterinburg. One of the largest archives in Russia: it has over 10,000 newsreels, 7,000 documentaries, 200 feature films and fifty animated films....
Hungary 1956: Our Revolution
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Hungary 1956 Our Revolution Written, directed and produced by Mark Kidel Calliope Films; first broadcast on BBC Four HISTORY TODAY FILM OF THE YEAR Half a century ago the impossible happened: a small Central-East European...
Leaving Burma Behind: Burma Became Independent Sixty Years Ago This Month. Ben Morris Asks If Britain Could Have Done More for This Unhappy Country
Burma (Myanmar) is a country on its knees. Its people, among the poorest in the world, live out an Orwellian nightmare. Child soldiers march as slave workers dig. The SPDC regime is politically isolated and obsessively insular, its paranoid and corrupt...
Magical Mystery Tour
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] I am ten years old, perched in the shady branches of a mulberry tree in Bakersfield California, trying to escape the baking heat of summer. I am reading a Nancy Drew mystery story. I like the idea of physical clues and of...
Mahatma Gandhi Is Shot: January 30th, 1948
The twentieth century's most famous apostle of non-violence himself met a violent end. Mohandas Mahatma ('the great soul') Gandhi, who had taken a leading role in spearheading the campaign for independence from Britain, hailed the partition of the...
Silk Ties: The Links between Ancient Rome & China
China and Rome were the two great economic superpowers of the Ancient World. Yet their empires were separated by thousands of miles of inhospitable terrain, dramatically reducing the opportunities for direct communication. Raoul McLaughlin investigates...
The Common Reader: Rosalind Crone Introduces a Database of Readers and Reading Habits since 1450
'Do the customers at publishing houses, the members of book-clubs and circulating libraries, and the purchasers and borrowers of newspapers and reviews, compose altogether the great bulk of the reading public of England?' In 1858, the novelist Wilkie...
The Story of the Kelly Gang
[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED] Mark Juddery introduces The Story of the Kelly Gang, possibly the first-ever feature film, now largely lost, that was made a hundred years ago in Australia about the notorious outlaw with the unusual body-armour. Hugely popular...
The Ulster Heritage: Peter Furtado Finds out How Hundreds of Local Historical Initiatives Are Changing the Political and Cultural Climate of Northern Ireland
What is heritage? Dame Liz Forgan, who as Chair of the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) is in a position to know, refuses to define the word, saying that it is whatever people who apply to her for a public grant think it is. But there is a persistent feeling,...
Time Piece: Working Men and Watches: John Styles Considers Whether the Fashion for Wearing Pocket-Watches Flourished among Working Men in the Eighteenth Century Because It Was Stylish, Because They Needed to Know the Time Accurately, or for Some Other Reason
[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED] In 1747, William Hutton, a twenty-four-year old journeyman framework knitter at Nottingham, bought a silver watch for 35 shillings. 'It had been the pride of my life, ever since pride commenced, to wear a watch', he later...
Writing It Down: Gordon Brown's Promised Written Constitution-If It Happens-Won't Be the First in British History, as Patrick Little Reminds Us
Britain, famously, has no written constitution, relying instead on a hotchpotch of laws, customs and conventions. 'Many of them are clearly defined--and most, indeed, are in written form--but there is no single document that underlies the modern British...
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