History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 58, No. 4, April

Bad Blood: Powell, Heath and the Tory Party: Forty Years after Enoch Powell Was Sacked from the Shadow Cabinet by Conservative Leader Ted Heath for His 'Rivers of Blood' Speech, Robert Pearce Investigates the Fierce Rivalry of Two Very Different Conservatives
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In April 1968 Tory leader of the opposition Edward Heath sacked his shadow defence secretary Enoch Powell after the most memorable and infamous speech of the second half of the twentieth century. Powell, vaunted by friends...
CND: The Story of a Peace Movement: Sue Donnelly Introduces the Archives of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, 50 Years Old This Spring, and a Project Make Them Accessible to a Wider Audience
We shall seek to persuade British People that Britain must: a) Renounce unconditionally the use or production of nuclear weapons and refuse to allow their use by others in her defence. b) Use her utmost endeavour to bring about negotiations at...
Editor's Letter
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] How should a society acknowledge the history of minority communities within its borders, particularly minorities that have suffered at the hands of the majority? The issue has been in the news recently, as the new Australian...
Foreign Tastes: Continental Chefs Dominated London's Restaurant World in the Nineteenth Century
Today no high street in London is without its restaurants and takeaways selling food from all around the world--China, Thailand, South Asia as well as southern Europe and the Middle East, Mexico and South America. While such establishments have proliferated...
Going Ape over Darwin: Mark Bryant on Cartoons of the Man Who Shook Victorian Society to the Core
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Charles Darwin was a gift to Victorian cartoonists and caricaturists, both in Britain and overseas. His bushy eyebrows, bald head, deep-set eyes, short nose and long beard made him look like some ancient species of monkey,...
Liverpool through the Lens: Charlotte Crow Tells How a Remarkable Photographer Will Be Celebrated in Two Exhibitions Organized by the National Trust during Liverpool's European Capital of Culture Year
In 1979 an elderly man living on his own came to the attention of Liverpool social services after suffering a fall. Since his wife had died nine years earlier he had become a practical recluse and was now finding it increasingly difficult to move about...
London's Olympics, 1908: Stephen Halliday Recalls the First Occasion on Which the Olympic Movement Visited Britain
The London Olympics of 1908 should have been the Rome Olympics. The decision to award the fourth Olympics to Rome was taken in the belief that its fame and accessibility would encourage competitors to attend from all over the world, attendance at the...
Polite Accomplishments: Anthony Fletcher Delves into the Diaries of Teenage Girls in the Georgian and Victorian Eras to Explore the Little-Changing Constraints, Punishments and Occasional Delights of Being Brought Up a Girl in Upper-Class Britain before the Great War
Many of the novels that appeared in Britain between the years 1814 and 1865, featured a governess. The best known fictional governesses are Becky Sharp, in William Thackeray's Vanity Fair (1847), who rose in Regency society through her own energetic...
Quebec at Four Hundred: Patricia Cleveland-Peck Visits the Capital of French Canada Which Is Celebrating Its 400th Birthday This Year
Quebec City is 400 years old in 2008 and is holding a birthday party which cannot fail to interest the history-lover. Hundreds of events are scheduled: tours, plays, concerts and exhibitions--including 'Passagers/ Passengers' which traces some of the...
Queen of Scots, Dauphine of France
April 24th, 1558 Mary became Queen of Scots when she was less than a week old, on the death of her father, James in December 1542. Crowned at nine months, she was in the charge first of the Earl of Arran and then of her redoubtable mother, Mary...
Reds under the Bed: International Alarm over the Terrorist Threat Is Not New. Anthony Read Relates How the Appearance of Bolshevism Created a State of near Hysteria throughout the Western World
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] At 10.45 pm on December 30th, 1918, a bomb exploded at the home of Ernest T. Trigg, President of the Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce. Ten minutes later another went off at the apartment of Acting Superintendent of Police...
Sir Howard Colvin: Geoffrey Tyack Remembers the Renowned Architectural Historian Who Died on December 27th, 2007
Sir Howard Colvin was the last survivor of a triumvirate who dominated English architectural history during the second half of the twentieth century. Together with Sir Nikolaus Pevsner and Sir John Summerson, he rescued the subject from amateurs and...
Spaces in the Past: Martin Evans Talks to Helen Dunmore, Whose Historical Novels Range from the Worst Horrors of Twentieth-Century, Warfare to the Luxurious World of Late Republican Rome
Helen Dunmore does not limit herself to one genre. She has an impressive reputation as a poet, children's novelist and short-story writer. Yet, she is perhaps most famous for her historical fiction such as Darkness at Zennor, about D.H. Lawrence and...
That Magnificent Man in His Flying Machine: Richard Stoneman Investigates the Strange but Widely Held Belief in the Middle Ages, That Alexander the Great Had Conquered More Than the Land, Taking to the Air and Travelled to the Ocean Depths
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) is one of the most famous names of antiquity In just twelve years he created by conquest the largest empire the world had yet seen, stretching from Macedon in the west to the River Indus in...
The Case for Conscription
Many who supported the campaign for compulsory military service in Edwardian Britain saw it as a necessary measure against the threat of invasion and the shadow of German militarism. Others identified it as a valuable counter to 'softness, indiscipline...
The Death of the Dream
April 4th, 1968 In a country with a history of great oratory Martin Luther King stands high. His spellbinding 'I Have a Dream' speech to a huge crowd in Washington DC in 1963 was admired all over the world. He had first come to public attention...
Violence and the Law in Medieval England: How Dangerous Was Life in the Middle Ages? Sean McGlynn Gets to Grips with the Level of Violent Crime, and the Sometimes Cruel Justice Meted out to Offenders
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The medieval world has an understandable reputation for brutality. In 2002, during the trial of Slobodan Milosevic at the war crimes tribunal at The Hague, the chief prosecutor, Carla del Ponte, accused the Butcher of the...
Which Way Cuba? as Fidel Castro Finally Hands over the Reins of Power after Forty-Nine Years, Michael Simmons Finds His Country Poised between Past and Future
Since I was frequently in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe in the last two decades of the Cold War, a recent visit to Cuba brought uncanny reminders of that other multi-nation community. There were the routine queues outside what might or might...

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