History Today

History Today is a monthly magazine published by History Today, Ltd. Founded in 1951, it is owned by Andy Patterson and has a circulation of roughly 30,000 subscribers. Headquarters are based in London, England.The magazine, which is geared towards teachers, students, and those with an interest in history, publishes essays written by some leading history scholars covering myriad periods, regions, topics, and themes in history. It is available in print and online.The print version was founded by Brendan Backen, who worked as the Minister of Information during World War II. He was also the publisher of the Financial Times. Currently, both print and online versions are published under the vision and guide of editor-in-chief, Paul Lay.History Today offers readers articles ranging from atomic medicine to the rise and fall of empires. Each essay comes with illustrations selected by picture editor Sheila Corr. The web edition includes a news digest from web editor, Kathryn Hadley.Subscribers can buy an annual subscription for either the web or print version. Web subscribers can also purchase access to articles from the publication's archives dating back to 1980. The magazine also has a sister publication, History Review, which is aimed at students and is published three times each year.

Articles from Vol. 52, No. 7, July

Academic Antisemitism: The Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen and the Jews.(National Socialist Party History in Germany)
`I WILL NEVER FORGET THIS University', proclaimed Adolf Hitler, `its youth were the first to declare their support for me'. The Friedrich-Alexander University's declaration of support came in 1929, when it became the first university to elect a...
African Galleries. (Letters)
The appreciation of African history, arts and cultures has been impoverished by the type of labelling (`pigeonholing') advocated by Julian Spalding (April, 2002). Western notions of the tribe, the Orient and the Arab World create a picture of Africa...
Conflict and Community in Sri Lanka: William Clarance Explores the Origins and Complexities of the Sri Lankan Civil War
THE SINHALESE-TAMIL controversy over who arrived first in Sri Lanka and so has the better claim to be its `founding race' has done much to contribute to the bitterness of intercommunal tensions which, in July 1983, erupted into the present civil...
Dr Livingstone, I Presume? Andrew Ross Reconsiders the Reputation-Both Contemporary and Historical-Of the Scottish Missionary and Explorer.(Dr. David Livingstone South African Historian)
WHEN IN 1851 HE ARRIVED in Cape Town from what is now Botswana, David Livingstone (1813-73) was at first distressed and then increasingly angry at the political situation he found there. After ten years in the north he had come to the Cape to see...
John Erickson. (Frontline).(Critical Essay)
ONE OF THE MANY STORIES about John Erickson is of him finding out in Moscow during the Cold War years that a new journal on nuclear strategy was being published there. He asked if he could take a look at it. No, he was told, sorry, it's classified,...
Michael Camille. (Frontline).(Brief Article)(Critical Essay)
LAST JUNE, the innovative and creative art historian Michael Camille contributed to the History Today-Reaktion Books lecture series Picturing the Past, with a talk on `Spinning Pigs and Smelly Streets: The Other Chartres'. The subject matter, part...
Peter Stansky: Daniel Snowman Meets the Historian of British Culture from William Morris, Via Bloomsbury, to the Beatles. (Today's History)
`IT IS A TRUTH universally admitted that we all speak badly of others, even of those of whom we may in fact be quite fond.' You have to warm to a historian who is prepared to embed such a sentiment in the midst of a learned treatise about the...
The Abdication of King Farouk: July 26th, 1952. (Months Past).(history Egypt)(Brief Article)
PAUNCHY, BALDING and bloated, Farouk was thirty-two when he lost his throne. The Egyptian monarchy had been set up by the British in the 1920s and Farouk had been king for sixteen years since succeeding his father, Fuad I, in 1936. Sir Miles Lampson,...
The Battle of the Golden Spurs: July 11th, 1302. (Months Past).(Flanders and France in history)(Brief Article)
HUNDREDS OF pairs of golden spurs were found on the bodies of dead knights on the battlefield and hung up in triumph in the abbey church of Courtrai, whose townspeople had inflicted a remarkable defeat on the massed chivalry of France. Courtrai...
The British in Jenin. (Frontline)
THE TOWN WAS SEEN BY THE OCCUPYING FORCES as a centre for Arab `terror'. An assassination meant something had to be done, a `reprisal' in the words of once official. And sending in the soldiers to blow up people's houses seemed the best way of rooting...
`The Chinese Convert'. (Frontline).(portrait of Shen Fu-Tsung by Godfrey Kneller)
IN A GALLERY featuring seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century `courtly portraiture' at Tate Britain, the spirituality of Godfrey Kneller's portrait of a young Chinese man, currently on loan from the Royal Collection, provides a thought-provoking...
The Edwardian Country House: Juliet Gardiner Assesses the Worth of `Television History' and Pinpoints the Value of `Reality History'. (Today's History).(analysis)
`OMNE BONUM SUPERNE' (All Good Comes From Above) reads the inscription over the gate at Manderston, a neo-Classical country house set amidst fifty-six acres of formal gardens and parkland just over the border in the Scottish lowlands. The house...
The History of Parliament. (Frontline).(The History of Parliament Trust Publishes History Installment)
THE HISTORY OF PARLIAMENT TRUST, originally founded in the 1930s and still going strong, will publish this month the latest instalment in its multi-volume history, covering the House of Commons in the years immediately following the Glorious Revolution....
The Princely Court in Northern Europe, 1270-1380: Malcolm Vale Argues That the Spectacular Culture of the Early Modern Court Had Its Origins in the Medieval Princely Household.(traveling Courts)
`ESSENTIALLY A GREAT, MOVEABLE household'--this is the image of the early Tudor court evoked by the splendidly displayed collections in the new British Galleries, 1500-1900, at the Victoria and Albert Museum. Imagine the scene: the court accompanied...
The Retirement of Lord Salisbury: July 11th, 1902. (Months Past).(Prime Minister, United Kingdom)(Brief Article)
THE THIRD MARQUESS of Salisbury was the last prime minister to run Britain from the House of Lords, for most of the period between June 1885 and his retirement in 1902. He held the office altogether for close to fourteen years, which outdid Gladstone,...
Toyes and Trifles: Anna Keay Describes How the Crown Jewels Were Dispersed and Destroyed in 1649, and Then Reconstructed in 1661.(england)
ON JANUARY 31ST, 1626, two days before his coronation, Charles I called for the principal pieces of the English regalia to be assembled at Whitehall Palace. The state jewels were accordingly brought from the Tower of London and the medieval coronation...
Votes for Men. (Letters)
The article on Emmeline Pankhurst (`Deeds not Words', May 2002), in emphasising the feminist angle on the campaign for equal voting rights for women, embodied the usual distortion of history that surrounds this topic. The campaign for equal voting...
What Is History for? Peter Mandler Argues That Academic Historians Have a Crucial Contribution to Make to the Nation's Cultural Life. (Today's History).(United Kingdom)
ALMOST A CENTURY AGO, in a celebrated essay, `Clio: A Muse', G.M. Trevelyan appealed to British historians to resist the rising tide of `scientific', highly professionalised history that he saw arriving on his shores from Germany. He sketched out...
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