Journal of Social History

The Journal of Social History is a scholarly journal covering research in social history, social science and genealogy from all periods worldwide. The Journal of Social History is published quarterly by George Mason University in Fairfax, Va. Peter N. Stearns is the editor.

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 3, Spring

"A Class of People Neither Freemen nor Slaves": From Spanish to American Race Relations in Florida, 1821-1861
With a history of multi-national colonial experiences, Florida presents unique opportunities for students of comparative slavery and race relations. Under Spanish rule from 1565 until 1763, Florida became British for two decades, an interlude highlighted...
Asylum: The Complex and Controversial Story of Mental Institutions in the U.S.A
Asylum: The Complex and Controversial Story of Mental Institutions in the U.S.A. Co-produced by Sarah Patton and Sarah Mondale (Washington, D.C.: Stone Lantern Films, 1989). In a graphic and absorbing way, Asylum brings to the viewer the essence of...
Household Economies and Communal Conflicts on a Russian Serf Estate, 1800-1817
Introduction In serf Russia, as in other rural societies, the household and and the village community were the twin pillars of peasant life. (1) Both the household and the commune in serf Russia have been the focus of considerable research over...
Suicide, Gender, and the Fear of Modernity in Nineteenth-Century Medical and Social Thought
In the early nineteenth century numerous European and North American commentators warned that the growth of cities would be accompanied by an assortment of social ills, all of which could be traced to the destruction of traditional social relations....
Unitarian Philanthropy and Cultural Hegemony in Comparative Perspective: Manchester and Boston, 1827-1848
In the summer of 1816, Reverend Joseph Tuckerman, pastor to a small Unitarian congregation in Chelsea, Massachusetts, journeyed to England and formed a set of lasting impressions about urban life and economic change. London's beggars and destitute children...
Urban and National Identity: Bremen, 1860-1920
Introduction Peasants in many areas of France had no geographic concept of their country, maintained dialects which separated them from neighboring citizens and lacked a consciousness of being French well past the mid-nineteenth century. These...
Who Joined the Confederate Army? Soldiers, Civilians, and Communities in Mississippi
There is no shortage of testimony explaining southerners' decision to join the Confederate army. Civil War soldiers were as voluble about their reasons for enlisting as they were about their wartime experiences, and historians have found central themes...