Newsweek International

Newsweek International is a consumer magazine covering general interest issues with editorial content. Newsweek Inc. publishes this periodical weekly. Fareed Zakaria is the Editor.

Articles from October 4

A Consensus for Change : Billionaire Masayoshi Son Says the Internet Revolution Has Finally Reached Japan. but It's Still Very Much in Its Infancy
Japanese billionaire Masayoshi Son is the self-proclaimed king of the Internet. By his own calculations, the 41-year-old founder and president of Softbank Corp. owns at least 7 percent of all publicly traded Web companies, more than either Bill Gates...
A Launch for the Little Guy : Satellite Technology Can Now Help Real People
Spy satellites were always more than just another cog in the machinery of state surveillance. They were the most elusive of cold-war status symbols-- it's a lot easier to make a nuke than a decent orbital-imaging system--and they were useful, too....
A Scheme of Beauty : Did the Pricetag for the Restoration of the Kremlin and Other Buildings Include Kickbacks to the Yeltsin Family?
Felipe Turover is not the kind of guy a prosecutor usually wants as a star witness. Handsome, slick, the bearer of two passports (Israel and Spain) and rumored to have been linked to the KGB, the Russian emigre was a freelance debt collector, trying...
A Victory for Principles
As NATO's secretary-general, Javier Solana has presided over momentous changes in the alliance: accepting Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary as the first new members from the former Soviet bloc; establishing a new consultative relationship with...
Containment to Disengagement : It's Time That the West Realized That Only Russians Can Save Russia. and If They Don't
There was a well-defined goal for the postwar containment strategy of the United States. But it appears that very few policymakers believed it would actually happen. The collapse of the Soviet Union came as a huge surprise for the American elite, Sovietologists...
Crazy for the Net: You Thought That Japanese Investors Were in Thrall to Stodgy Brokerages and Savings Accounts? Think Again
Takeo Nakajima's entrepreneurial dreams materialized in his childhood bedroom. Last year the 25-year-old Keio University graduate turned the tiny space into a warren of cheap computers, tangled cables and scurrying part- time employees who work odd...
Dollars and Discontent : Latin American Currencies Have Often Turned into Funny Money. but Giving Them Up May Be No Panacea
The other day an elderly Brazilian woman took a taxi from her home in Copacabana to downtown Rio de Janeiro with a pocketbook full of dogeared bank notes. Recently widowed, she came upon the stash going through the pockets of her late husband's clothes....
Getting Ready to Party : Beijing Cracks Down and Cleans Up So There Won't Be Any Surprises on the 50th National Day Anniversary
On Oct. 1, 1949, a silent but excited crowd of half a million people assembled to watch Mao Zedong announce the birth of the People's Republic of China. Suddenly, a yellow dog bolted along the parade route on Changan Avenue. "Look! It's Chiang Kai-shek,"...
'I Don't Have Enemies' : Chavez on the Coup and His Philandering Predecessors
After baseball, Hugo Chavez's favorite pastime has to be talking. Before heading to the United States last week, Chavez spoke with NEWSWEEK's Joseph Contreras in the Miraflores Palace in Caracas. Excerpts: CONTRERAS: Where do you want to take Venezuela?...
In a League of His Own : Can Hugo Chavez Put Venezuela Back in the Game? and Can He Keep the Country's Armed Forces out of It?
Not every visiting head of state would interrupt a breakneck schedule of top-level talks in Washington to play softball. But Hugo Chavez, 45, is anything but a run-of-the-mill politician. On a balmy late-summer afternoon last week, pausing briefly...
Kim Plays Hardball : Tackling Corruption and Silencing a Critic?
As parties go, this one flopped big time. Hundreds of reporters and employees filed into the auditorium on the 34th anniversary of JoongAng Ilbo, one of South Korea's top newspapers, but nobody was celebrating. Grim-faced, Hong Seok Hyun, the publisher...
Letters
Our Sept. 6 report on educational reform around the world garnered high marks from supporters. "Schools are the breeding ground for a thinking mind, the development of which must be given top priority," one reader said. "We need to encourage a creative...
One of the World's Leading Rock Stars Argues That Help for the Poorest Is a Pressing Moral Issue of Our Time
It's the kind of endorsement that would delight any campaign. Last week the pope met a clutch of celebrities in a demonstration of support for the cancellation of Third World debts. The Jubilee 2000 campaign is pressing the developed nations to wipe...
Perspectives
"Hurry, go rescue people." Unidentified woman speaking to those who pulled her from the wreckage of a collapsed hotel in taipei, after the earthquake hit taiwan "I just missed getting hit by a bullet. But we won't stop until this country is democratic."...
Putting the World Back Together : As the Global Economy Club Gathers for Its Annual Meeting in Washington, You Can Almost Hear the Sighs of Relief. Hang on a Minute What's Happening to the Dollar?
A year ago, it looked like the capitalist vanguard might have led us all dangerously astray. Devaluation and default in Russia had shaken the world's confidence. The journey to global prosperity through market economics suddenly felt like a forced...
Renewing the Social Contract : As Europe Enters an Era of Growth, the New Left Can Now Build a Consensus for Structural Reform
Nineteen ninety-nine will in all likelihood be remembered as a year of achievement for Europe. There were two landmark events: The euro was born on Jan. 1, and ethnic cleansing was fought in the Balkans, where reconstruction has now begun. The year...
Rethinking the Iron Lady : Major -- and Others -- Take Aim at Baroness Thatcher
The message of Margaret Thatcher's prime ministership was trim and uncomplicated, like the trademark no-nonsense handbag she donated to Cambridge University. "I am in politics," she once said, "because of the conflict between good and evil, and I believe...
Spending Their Way to Prosperity : The Asian Recovery Cannot and Will Not Depend on Exports or Booming Property Markets. Shoppers: Open Those Pocketbooks!
The consumer is the key to ensuring that Asia can sustain its remarkable recovery. The reason is simple: it is foolish for the Asian economies to rely on exporting alone. The chief risk to the Asian recovery is now external, not internal. The threat...
'These People Are Scary' : White-Robed Paramilitaries Stand against the Army
They appeared like some strange apparition. Into the mayhem of Jakarta's main street, where for two days police had fired on student protesters lobbing gasoline bombs and rocks, came an army of 2,000 men. Clad in white flowing robes and turbans and...
Where Did Russia's Money Go? : In the Yeltsin Years, Many Ordinary Folk and outside Investors Lost All They Had. the Tale of the How a Country Was Fleeced
Gela Grinyova is one of the unfortunate Russians who made the mistake of once having faith in her country's banking system. By the summer of 1998, the 32-year-old graphic artist and her husband had about $11,000 in a bank called SBS Agro, the largest...
Why the World Owes My People : Nations That Ignored East Timorese Suffering 24 Years Ago Must Help Now
Much of my beloved homeland of East Timor has been destroyed, my people displaced. Much of their land has been forcibly depopulated by Indonesian forces, with hundreds of thousands suffering from hunger and disease. Many have been killed or wounded;...
'You Can't Run, You Can't Hide': Or Can You? the Gunmen Are Going Undercover, Even as U.N. Peacekeepers Are Claiming Victory. outside Dili, Danger Still Lurks around Every Corner
The people of East Timor couldn't help but feel twinges of optimism. As Australian-led peacekeeping troops rolled in and started arresting armed thugs who had been terrorizing the territory, young men came pouring down from the hills where they had...