American Journalism Review

Trade journal reporting on broadcast and print journalism. For Trade and Professional audiences.

Articles from Vol. 22, No. 9, November

Asher Boisvert: Different's Definitely a Deterrent
ORANGE SPIKES OF HAIR, 10 OF THEM, CAREFULLY GELLED AND glued to withstand rain, wind or an unwanted touch, protrude from his head. The effect is Lady Liberty gone punk. Asher Boisvert shuffles down the school hallway, shoulders hunched forward,...
A TRUER PICTURE of Teens' Lives
SINNERS AND SAINTS. VILLAINS AND VICTIMS. SUPER-achievers and slackers. In the mainstream press, teens are often no more than stock characters, traversing a life stage that adults view through the hazy lens of memory. Rarely afforded the space or...
A Vast Wasteland
Local news is increasingly hard to find on commercial radio. Ann Hollifield will never forget it. There she was, in a hotel room in Yankton, South Dakota, alone in the midst of a vicious thunderstorm. The University of Georgia journalism professor...
Boston Shoot-Out
Boston's legendary newspaper rivalry is about to jump from cross-town to cross-region. The Boston Herald, the scrappy, underdog competitor of the Boston Globe, added some muscle to its fight in September by purchasing a chain of suburban papers...
Casey Medals
Awarded for Distinguished Coverage The annual Casey Medals for Meritorious Journalism, presented by the Casey Journalism center for Children and Families, honor distinguished coverage of disadvantaged U.S. children and families. This year; 18...
Courting Trouble
The legal system is no place to sort out editorial disputes. Investigative journalism often depends on whistleblowers--insiders who provide information to reporters about the wrong-doing of government or the corporate world. The value of whistleblowers...
Crunch Time
Besieged by competitors, its audience shrinking, CNN shakes up its management team. But can its new leaders, all CNN insiders, find a bold new way to regain momentum? On a corridor wall in CNN's Washington bureau hangs an oversize chart resembling...
Difficult Times
The New York Times explains itself. In 1992, when he was with the Los Angeles Times, James Risen broke a story about discord in the Bush administration over economic policy. The ensuing silence was deafening. The next day the New York Times matched...
Football, Academically Speaking
Comedian Dennis Miller's often lofty and cerebral performances as the new guy on ABC's "Monday Night Football" have earned him quite a few negative reviews. As is his shtick, Miller adds Trivial Pursuit-ish references to his color commentating, and...
He's with the Band
How close to a source is too close? Back when Gene Simmons and I were both younger and thinner and therefore better suited to such foolishness, I scammed a backstage pass to cover a Kiss concert. This was about as close as I ever came to being a...
Language Barriers
What guidelines do news organizations use when it comes to publishing or airing offensive language? "Damn" is no longer a bad word. At least not much of one. "Hell"? Nope, not a bad word either. "Ass"? Well, that's generally OK, too. But "asshole"?...
Late Night with Al and Dubya
We've come a long way since the days of Richard on "Laugh-In" and Bill Clinton's saxo phone stint on "Arsenio Hall." Now it's pretty much a given that in addition to devising a Social Security plan, trading barbs over foreign policy and posing for...
Listen-Things Have Changed
WHEN I WAS GROWING UP, ELIZABETH GALINDO was the strict mom among my friends' parents; you didn't dare break her rules. She never (it seemed) had to ask her children twice to do anything. Yet this devout Catholic and mother of four crackled with humor....
Media High
While the morning announcements squawked over the P.A. at Fremont High in Oakland, California, the students in Steve O'Donoghue's newspaper class added their own buzz to the electric whine of the speakers. They were brainstorming for the next issue...
Not Too Young for News
The September launch of Time Magazine Big Picture edition reeled in half a million new subscribers, but most of these new readers can't even read. Designed to cater to the "emergent" reader in kindergarten and first grade, the Big Picture joins...
Rush to Judgment
The New York Times uncritically embraced the outlook of investigators in its breathless coverage of the Wen Ho Lee case. As a result, the nation's premier news organization tarnished not only the scientist but also its own reputation. It was the...
Second-Class Citizens
Olympic officials unfairly shut out online journalists. Imagine the agonizing years of sweat and tears, of battling the odds, of struggling for recognition from doubters and critics, of pushing the limits of journalistic perfection...only to have...
Suburban Sprawl
Reaching readers outside the city remains a vexing challenge for major metro papers. For the last 50 years the growth of suburbs around the nation's large cities has had a profound effect on newspapers, ultimately sending dozens to the graveyard...
Talking the Talk
As the nation's Hispanic population continues to grow rapidly, speaking Spanish is becoming an increasingly crucial skill in America's newsrooms. BACK IN THE DARK AGES, SAY AROUND 1978, THE WASHington Post's Joel Garreau led a team that set out...
The Island-Hopping Miami Herald
The Miami Herald is heading for the fun-in-the-sun crowd to bolster its bank account and circulation figures. With long-distance printing just a push button away, the Herald is producing its international edition on several Caribbean islands to...
The Media Go to Camp
Sportswriter Sam Smith may not be a professional athlete or coach, but he's teaching pro basketball players a thing or two. Smith, who covers the National Basketball Association for the Chicago Tribune, wants to make sure that athletes and the media...
The Story's Aftermath
ASHER NEVER MEANT TO BE A POSTER BOY FOR THE RIDGUEED. "I didn't know [Walsh] was going to use all the details, like what people said to me and stuff," he said. Ruth Boisvert said she and her husband were "native" in agreeing to their son's interviews...
The Wrath of Bobby Knight Fans
Out of the firestrom set off when the Indianapolis Star reported that Bobby Knight had been fired as Indiana University men's basketball coach, two responses burn in the mind of sports columnist Bill Benner. After one caller left a message for Benner...
Too Trite and So True
"The 100 Worst Groaners" is an apt name for a page on www.newswriting.com that lists a plethora of broadcast writing cliches. But the blunt and humorous descriptions of these script no-nos, written by site owner Abe Rosenberg, will make you laugh while...
Yo! Read This!
The Philadelphia Daily News is a gritty tabloid with great sports coverage, attitude-laden headlines and a perfect feel for the tough town it calls home. But Editor Zack Stalberg wants more: He wants the paper to be a civic crusader. The tip came...