American Journalism Review

Trade journal reporting on broadcast and print journalism. For Trade and Professional audiences.

Articles from Vol. 16, No. 1, January-February

A Gap in Access to Court Documents
Day after day, courthouse reporters across the country saunter into clerks' offices and sift through documents, looking for stories. It is so routine that it seldom raises a question, unless a reporter gets too pushy. The reality, though, is that there...
Brother vs. Brother, Reporter on Horseback
Instead of using laptop computers and fax machines, reporters during the Civil War scrawled their stories in notebooks while riding horseback. The Society of Civil War Correspondents is convinced that experience is worth revisiting. Since 1986,...
Caught between the Past and Future
The overall improvement in newspaper management, a subject covered in my November column, faces a severe test because of the future confluence of two major trends. The first is the newspaper industry's weakening hold on local retail advertising,...
Changing Times
In April 21, 1991, Anna Quindlen did something that New York Times columnists never do. She used her "Public & Private" column on the op-ed page to attack the editors of the Times. She criticized the editors' treatment of Patricia Bowman, the woman...
Getting a Grasp on Freedom
GRASP, the students reveal, is an acronym they use to "grasp" the five freedoms of the First Amendment they've been learning. G stands for grievance, as in "to petition the government for a redress of grievances." Young Tyler Barnwell understands very...
Inside Job
A fresh breeze of communication-in the form of an employee newsletter--is blowing inside the Central Intelligence Agency. And it's not the mouthpiece one might expect. Since its inception a year ago, What's News at CIA has not shrunk from reporting...
J-School Students Saved from Photos
In one photo, a topless woman feeds a man spaghetti as they lounge in bed. In the other, a bulldog sits on an American flag. Offended yet? Plenty of professors and students would be, insists the publisher of the popular journalism textbook, "News...
Legislating Ethics
Last winter the Kansas City Star got a hot tip: Municipal employees were selling city-owned asphalt mix to a privately owned gas station. The Star sent a reporter to the scene. The station operator asked the reporter for $30 to cover the payment, the...
Sperling Breakfast Catch of the Day: Ed Rollins
Rep. Tom Foley has eyes only for his cereal bowl. He's arrived a few minutes late but is still determined to accomplish what most speakers at Sperling breakfasts have given up even trying to do-finishing his meal. Godfrey Sperling Jr. isn't helping....
Sure, He's No Angel, but Is He Obscene?
When Florida publisher Mike Diana received a letter from the Pinelias County clerk last April, he figured it was a notice for an overdue parking ticket. Instead, he found a summons to face obscenity charges for his photocopied magazine, Boiled Angel....
Teach Kids the Value of Free Expression
One of my colleagues at The Freedom Forum First Amendment Center has a slightly worn $10 bill he holds up at speeches around the country and offers to anyone who can recite the five freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment. He has been doing...
The Age of Convergence
In the pleasantly upscale Cascades housing development in Northern Virginia, Bell Atlantic has created a deceptively low-key "Intelligent Home" at 20648 Bellwood Court. Each room displays interactive services and tools that address family members'...
The Children's Beat
As the children's beat grows, journalists face vexing issues. Should the media be advocates for children, and if so, how far should they go? What are the ethical issues involved in interviewing children and families? How do journalists get past the...
The Difficult Birth of a Free Press
In many ways, Janos Havasi was typical of the new breed of Hungarian publishers who started privately owned newspapers after the fall of communism. Havasi, 41, was a professor of political science at Janos Pannonius University in the old southern Hungarian...
The War against Television Reporters
Covering news for local television is becoming hazardous. Reporters and camera crews are encountering an increasingly hostile public, and physical threats are becoming routine. "We always thought we were like the Red Cross," says Jeff Wald, news...