American Journalism Review

Trade journal reporting on broadcast and print journalism. For Trade and Professional audiences.

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 1, February-March

A Bad "Fit"
A few years ago William K. Marimow, then editor of the Baltimore Sun, filled out one of those interesting-facts-about-me surveys for the American Society of Newspaper Editors' magazine, The American Editor. After the Sun's publisher fired him in...
A Beheading in Baltimore: The Sun Jettisons an Outstanding Editor
The problem, said the Baltimore Sun's rookie publisher, was lack of "chemistry." There wasn't really a good "fit." She wanted a true "partner." And so Denise Palmer sacked one of America's top editors. Brutally. Maybe she should have tried counseling....
Bashful Barbra: A Judge Rules Streisand's Privacy Wasn't Violated by a Photo of Her Property
Oh, how hard it must be to be Barbra Streisand. "Adored by her fans, followed by the curious, and stalked by the obsessed," as a judge put it, she has chosen to reside in a lavish estate on a secluded parcel of land on a bluff overlooking the beach...
Embedded Obstacles
When the city of Miami declared de facto martial law while hosting a trade summit late last year, its plan for keeping so-called anarchists and other protesters at bay included putting the media on the front lines. Police Chief John Timoney, who...
Et Tu, "Nightline"? the Kobe Bryant and Michael Jackson Sagas Are the Latest Manifestations of the Media's Infatuation with Celebrity-Even Ted Koppel Ditched President Bush for the Erstwhile King of Pop. but Is That So Wrong? in an Era with So Many Sources of News, Is Celebrity Overkill a Major Threat to the Republic?
"If you don't want it printed, don't let it happen." That's the blunt, somewhat plucky motto of the Aspen Daily News, a small Colorado newspaper that in October made a blunt and somewhat plucky move. The paper, its editors decided, would no longer...
Fan Dancers on the Front Page; Readers Are Hungry for Engaging, Entertaining Stories
Spare time? Please. Finding some these days is about as likely as finding Brigadoon. But when I do manage to steal a day or two, I'm enjoying a guilty pleasure--researching a book about the late and inimitably great writer Joseph Mitchell. Journalists...
Haute Cuisine: Food Journalism, Once a Throwaway Compendium of Recipes and "What's Hot" Articles, Has Gone Upscale. Newspapers and Magazines Are Dedicating Top Talent to the Food Beat, and They Are Hungry for Sophisticated Stories with Timely Angles
R.W. "Johnny" Apple, the famously formidable New York Times chronicler of wars, presidents and political horse races, now spends his time scrutinizing such complexities as the bouquet of the French brandy Armagnac, the hybrid cuisine of the Italian...
Indianapolis 500: The Indianapolis Star Hasn't Really Had 500 Editors in Recent Years, Although It Might Seem That Way to the Whipsawed Staff. the Paper Has Dealt with Fallout from a Tumultuous Merger, Undergone an Ownership Change and Witnessed a Revolving Door of Newsroom Managers. Now a New Leadership Team Is Inspiring Hopes of Better Times Ahead
In late November, Indianapolis Star Editor Dennis Ryerson gathered his entire newsroom staff in the 500-seat auditorium of the Indiana War Memorial building. The main purpose of the meeting was to get people thinking about the often gloomy subject...
Local Heroes: They Don't Have the Exposure, Clout or Access of the Reporters in Washington's Major Bureaus. They Don't Necessarily Chase the Glamorous Story of the Day. Instead, the Capital's Regional Reporters Focus Resolutely on Issues That Matter to the Readers Back Home. and They Learn to Juggle
JUST BEFORE 10:30 A.M. IN THE DIRKSEN SENATE OFFICE BUILDING, Lisa Friedman, Washington correspondent for Los Angeles' Daily News, seizes her best opportunity to grill Jack Valenti, chairman of the Motion Picture Association of America. [ILLUSTRATION...
Nouveau Niche: Newspapers Are Once Again Turning to Niche Publishing
New free or cheap dailies in Chicago, New York, Dallas and Washington, D.C., aimed at commuters and specifically at the 18-to-34 age group. Weeklies oriented toward young people in several of Gannett's daily markets, with more to come throughout the...
Priming the Pump
To do its part in changing the face of American journalism, E.W. Scripps Co., recently launched its Academy for Hispanic Journalists at the Rocky Mountain News in Denver. The venture, geared toward early career journalists, has been enthusiastically...
Story of Their Lives
By spending a year with people fighting cancer, you could say that West Virginia University journalism students learned rather a lot. To even begin making as expansive a documentary as "Cancer Stories: Lessons in Love, Loss and Hope," they had to...
The Difference a Year Makes: If You Think You Know the New-Media Landscape, Wait a Year-Or a Few Months-And It Will Change
The number of U.S. homes with highspeed Internet connections ballooned nearly 50 percent from May 2002 to May 2003. In 2002 news video on the Web wasn't much of a factor; 2003 proved there is an audience that will watch, even pay, if it's good enough....
Viewer Beware: Stations Are Reenacting Scenes, Adding Sounds and Adopting Other Misleading Practices
Whatever happened to that old adage that seeing is believing? In Memphis and elsewhere, local television stations use reenactments on their newscasts. In Las Vegas and Los Angeles, stations add sound effects to news stories. And everywhere, from local...
What Reporting Gadgets Do You Use?
TODD BISHOP, 30, business reporter, Seattle Post-Intelligencer "I have an Olympus DS-330 digital voice recorder. This is one of those that you can put in the dock and transfer the files over the computer with. I use it for in-person interviews....
Wild Pitch
In November 1999, William Dean Singleton, CEO of the Denver-based MediaNews Group and owner of the Berkshire Eagle in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, answered the Pittsfield mayor's plea to help the town build a new baseball stadium. Over the next year-and-a-half,...