American Journalism Review

Trade journal reporting on broadcast and print journalism. For Trade and Professional audiences.

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 3, Winter

A Lifelong Passion for Journalism: After Four Years as Executive Producer of "Morning Edition," Madhulika Sikka Will Begin Directing NPR's News Operations in January
Madhulika Sikka had a classic journalist's upbringing. She grew up in England watching BBC News and fighting over the newspaper with her news-loving father. Now executive producer of NPR's "Morning Edition," she has worked all over the world, won Emmy...
Are These Guys Crazy? despite Newspapers' Much-Publicized Woes, They Continue to Attract Buyers. Who Are the New Newspaper Owners, and Why Are They Doing This?
It has happened in newsrooms across the country. News breaks that somebody is buying a newspaper, undoubtedly at a deeply discounted price. Buyout-weary reporters and editors look around their own newsrooms filled with empty desks and wonder: "Who...
Facts Still Dead: Columnist Rex Huppke, Who Wrote a Widely Read Obit for Facts Earlier This Year, Found Little Solace in the Distortion-Laden Presidential Campaign
Chicago Tribune columnist Rex Huppke attracted a great deal of attention last April when, disgusted by the avalanche of misinformation being tossed around on the campaign trail, he wrote an obituary for Facts. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The piece...
Going Where the People Are: TV Outlets Are Increasingly Targeting Hispanic Viewers
The TV business runs on numbers. So it's really no surprise that networks from ABC to Fox are ramping up their efforts to offer news aimed at Hispanic viewers. The real wonder is that it took so long. For years, Latinos were mostly ignored by the biggest...
Ignoring a War
Chances are, most people reading this review can name more reporters who covered Vietnam nearly a half century ago than reporters covering Afghanistan today. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Though some call it America's longest war at 11 years and counting,...
Just Make Sure You Don't Call It the Persian Gulf! There Are Quite a Few Things That Are Simply Not Mentioned in the Pages of the National, a Government-Owned English-Language Daily in the United Arab Emirates. a Veteran U.S. Newspaper Editor Reflects on His Adventures on the Paper's Foreign Desk
Madonna performed on June 3 in Abu Dhabi More than 20,000 fans had gathered at an outdoor arena. It was nighttime, but Abu Dhabi in June is brutally hot even after the sun goes down. The diva came onstage at 10:40 p.m.--an hour and 40 minutes late....
Just Say No: Time to Kick Quote Approval to the Curb
The quest for transparency in Washington has long been frustrating. For years government officials have loved briefing journalists on background, meaning their quotes can be used but the source cannot be identified by name. That's good for the officials'...
Mastering the Mobile Market: Clues on How to Reach News Junkies on Smartphones and Tablets
The fusion of smartphones and tablets with consumers' lives has been so freakishly fast and absolute, it's hard to believe that the iPhone debuted fewer than six years ago--and that the iPad has been around for fewer than three. As of August, around...
Mistaken Nation: With the Relentless Pressure to Move Quickly in the Era of the Twitter-Fueled 24/7 News Cycle, It's Probably Not Surprising That There Are So Many High-Profile Journalism Errors. All the More Reason to Double-And Triplecheck before Pulling the Trigger
In journalism, as in real life, stuff happens. It happened to Ben Smith on March 22, 2007. that morning, Smith, then a crack reporter and blogger at Politico, got a dynamite tip: John Edwards, the 2004 Democratic vice presidential nominee, would be...
Photographing the Forsaken: A Group of Student Photojournalists from Nebraska Learn about More Than Photography as They Chronicle the Experiences of the Downtrodden in India
A junkie wandered over as Andrew Dickinson finished off a bottle of water in the 109-degree heat. The American college student had been shaking hands, memorizing names and asking questions of the heroin users at the park for a week. The junkie thought...
Reinventing the American Press Institute: A Casualty of the Decline of the Newspaper Industry, the Highly Regarded Journalism Training Organization Was Absorbed Earlier This Year by the Newspaper Association of America Foundation. Is There a Vibrant Future for API in the Digital Era?
For newsmen and women who fondly remember the days of worthwhile training seminars on the company dime, nothing seemed to spur quite the collective disappointment as the loss of a 66-year-old midcareer training institute with a historic reputation....
The Most Dangerous Place in the World for Journalists: Twenty-Six Media Professionals Have Been Killed Covering the Conflict in Syria and Five Remain Missing. the Government Permits Few Correspondents to Enter Legally, Forcing Them to Sneak into the War-Torn Country and Travel with Rebel Forces. Yet Some Brave Reporters Are Providing Top-Notch Journalism
To enter Syria, CBS News foreign correspondent Clarissa Ward has squeezed through holes in fences, waded across canals and slogged through muddy fields in the middle of the night, paying smugglers to help her sneak past government checkpoints. [ILLUSTRATION...
The Press and Watergate
I found Max Holland's "Watergate Reconsidered" essay (Fall) interesting for the information it added, based on his research, about the true motives of Mark Felt, better known as Deep Throat, Bob Woodward's renowned source in the book and movie "All...
The Quote Approval Conundrum: Pushing Back against the Effort by Federal Officials and Campaign Operatives to Control the Content of Interviews
When he worked in the White House press office, Reid Cherlin made a practice of doing something journalists abhor: He filtered quotes. Cherlin, in keeping with a custom in the Obama administration, permitted reporters to interview high-ranking officials...
Unfair, but a Good Thing: Two-Tier Stock Structures Have Benefited the Times Co. and Other Media Companies
I first met Punch Sulzberger in the early 1970s, when he approached me and other securities analysts in a corridor near his office on the New York Times Co.'s executive floor. He was giggling, palming what appeared to be a miniature Slinky. I wondered:...