The American Prospect

A monthly political journal of liberal though. Contains articles that generate debate, further ideas, and set agendas; and provides a forum for working through the controversies and hard choices facing all Americans. Includes regular topics and features.

Articles from Vol. 11, No. 7, February 14

American Dream, American Opera
The Red Hook section of Brooklyn is only 20 miles from Manhasset Neck on Long Island, the places stand worlds, apart. Red Hook, as depicted in Arthur Miller s 1955 play A View the Bridge, is a sturdy working-class neighborhood that depends on the nearby...
And You Thought Tim Russert Was Tough
Back in September, subscribers to Red Herring magazine's e-mail bulletin "The Red Eye" received a missive they probably weren't expecting. "Tony Perkins here with a special invitation" began the message. "As most Red Herring readers know, I've stuck...
AOL-Time Warner's Kingly Prerogative
Any time now, government economists will decide whether America Online's (AOL's) $165-billion proposed take-over of Time Warner is likely to be good or bad for consumers. If good, the government will sign off. If bad, there'll be negotiations with...
Correspondence
TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE TO THE EDITORS: Peter Schrag's otherwise insightful piece on testing in Texas ["Too Good to Be True" TAP, January 3, 2000] obscures three important points about Texas and the TAAS (Texas Assessment of Academic Skills). ...
Death Row, Aisle Seat
Newt Gingrich once said that the key to building a new conservative majority in the United States rests with "low taxes and the death penalty." At least insofar as the death penalty is concerned, a generation of politicians has cultivated exactly the...
Did Labor Jump the Gun?
If Vice President Al Gore wins the Democratic nomination for president, he will have John Sweeney and the AFL-CIO to thank. The AFL-CIO boosted Gore's flagging campaign in October when it endorsed him over former Senator Bill Bradley. And in the primaries...
Healing Medicare
IT HAS BEEN A BLESSING FOR THE ELDERLY, BUT MEDICARE'S COVERAGE IS ERODING AND IT FACES A MOUNTING DEFICIT. HERE'S HOW TO FIX IT. Before enactment of Medicare in 1965, few elderly persons had reliable health insurance. When insurance was available,...
How the Economists Got It Wrong
The American Economic Association (AEA) met January 7-9 in Boston, for a millennial program distinguished by its attention to international policy issues, most particularly financial crises (as in Asia) and the failure of the so-called "economic transition"...
Incremental Reform toward What?
How to cure the American health care system depends on what you think ails it. The center and the right identify three basic maladies. First, there is a cost crisis. This view reflects the concerns of "payers"--employers who face rising premiums, federal...
Nurse, Interrupted
PATIENT WELL-BEING AND SURVIVAL RATES ARE GREATLY AFFECTED BY THE QUALITY OF NURSING CARE. SO WHY ARE WE DRIVING NURSES OUT OF THE PROFESSION? IT'S MAY 13, THE DAY AFTER FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE'S BIRTHDAY, AND AS PART OF the annual celebration of Nurses'...
Primary New Hampshire
WHY THE GRANITE STATE DESERVES TO BE FIRST NASHUA, NEW HAMPSHIRE--Political lore says that George Bush (pere) lost the 1980 primary when he sat grinning dumbly as Ronald Reagan proclaimed that he had "paid for this microphone" during a debate here....
Public Schools: An Ideal at Risk
Pity the U.S. public school. It is the last social institution left standing that mediates the entrance of most Americans into the lives of their communities and American society in general. A responsibility once shared on a much broader scale with...
Sexual Congress
Feminists have long regarded rape as a hate crime, like lynching. The view of sexual violence as a particularly vicious form of bigotry and social control may oversimplify the dynamics of any given sex crime (and overlook the historic use of rape allegations...
Southern Cross
George W. Bush has ducked the question of whether South Carolina should haul down the Confederate flag. But regardless of Bush's position, the flag will likely come down, and soon. Even before the huge demonstration on Martin Luther King, Jr., Day,...
Taps for Caps
BUDGET MYTHS AND REALITIES One problem the Republican leadership faces in boasting about the accomplishments of the 1999 congressional session is that one of them was the repudiation of the primary "success" they were trumpeting proudly in 1997....
The Bradley Republicans
THE STRANGE CROSSOVER APPEAL OF DOLLAR BILL By most conventional standards, Robert L. Burch III is an unlikely supporter of Bill Bradley. A 65-year-old executive at a New York hedge fund, Burch detests teachers' unions, trial lawyers, and liberal...
The Corporate ABCs
I knew something was odd when Microsoft's spelling checker corrected my typing of Bertelsmann, the German corporation that controls most of the world's English-language trade publishing. It's not your average English word. Neither are Westvaco, Enron,...
The Culture Wars
By far the most sensational moment of the Brooklyn Museum of Art's "Sensation" exhibit--more exciting than the shark in a tank, the mutant mannequin girls with penises coming out of their foreheads, or the stinky, bloody, maggot-infested cow's head;...
The Defining Issue
For liberals, it's the lost crusade. For conservatives, it's the emblematic case of overweening big government. Perhaps more clearly than in any other issue, federal action to achieve universal health coverage brings out ideological and partisan differences...
The Parent Panacea
URGING MOTHERS TO READ TO THEIR KIDS DOESN'T HELP THOSE WHO ARE SEMILITERATE THEMSELVES, HAVE FEW BOOKS, AND ARE UNFAMILIAR WITH PUBLIC LIBRARIES. Gloria Molina has been Los Angeles County's First District Supervisor since 1991, when courts ordered...
The Poor Count
Determining precisely who are the poorest Americans would seem to be a simple enough thing to do. But like many bureaucratic tasks, counting up the official poor is fraught with political complications. Last October the issue became front-page news...
What Teachers Know
In November of last year, 200 people, mostly mathematicians, sent an open letter to Secretary of Education Richard Riley. The letter asked him to withdraw the labels "exemplary" and "promising" that the Education Department had recently applied to...

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.