The American Prospect

A monthly political journal of liberal though. Contains articles that generate debate, further ideas, and set agendas; and provides a forum for working through the controversies and hard choices facing all Americans. Includes regular topics and features.

Articles from Vol. 11, No. 16, July 17

$80,000 and a Dream
A SIMPLE PLAN FOR GENERATING EQUAL OPPORTUNITY America has become a three-class society. While more than 25 percent of its children now graduate from four-year colleges, the lowest 20 percent inhabit a world of low wages and dead-end jobs. And...
Chamber of Horrors
The upper chamber of Congress should be up for grabs. But in too many Senate races, Democrats have issues but not candidates. Or they have national issues but not local ones. Or they have candidates but not money. Can they win anyway? ...
Correspondence
REQUIEM FOR A PUBLIC DEFENDER TO THE EDITORS: Alan Berlow has provided yet another stark and frightening example of the judicial system's abandonment of the constitutional rights of the accused ["Requiem for a Public Defender," June 5, 2000]....
Different Strokes
Vice President Gore has unveiled a supplemental retirement plan. The government would match private savings put aside by working families, with a match as generous as three to one for families with incomes under $30,000. Families with incomes as high...
Duel in the Sun
I'd like to write a bit about my father, Philip G. Epstein, and my uncle, Julius J., and the feud that developed between them and their boss, Jack L. Warner--a feud that shines a certain light on larger conflicts in American culture. Julie got to Warner...
Mirage of Meritocracy
After years of relative quiet, America's educational system is coming under renewed pressure over issues of fairness, access, and privilege. As competition intensifies over entry to college, it becomes harder to believe the system's rhetoric of merit...
Mister Mischief
In his films, underdog-with-a-camera Michael Moore has taken on former GM Chairman Roger Smith (Roger & Me) and Nike CEO Phil Knight (The Big One), but the premiere of Moore's newest half-hour series on Bravo, The Awful Truth (Wednesday nights,...
Mr. Gates Goes to Washington
Microsoft's borrowing of NRA lobbying tactics reveals the Republican tilt--and the naivete--of its political strategy. When The New York Times revealed in April that Microsoft had hired Ralph Reed, the onetime executive director of the Christian...
Pork, Sweet and Sour
Word was out in May that the Clinton administration was offering enticements to undecided congressional Democrats in order to win enough votes to permanently normalize trade with China--which the White House had singled out as key to the Clinton foreign...
Ridge over Troubled Water
A pro-choice Catholic could be just what the Bush ticket needs. The last time a Catholic bishop from Pennsylvania took an ax to some promising piece of vice presidential timber, it was a Democrat who got felled. That was in 1984, when the late Cardinal...
The Era of Great Social Rest
We are slouching toward two of the most inconsequential political conventions in American history, followed by the more riveting prospects of a World Series, the Olympics, the TV networks' fall premieres, Alan Greenspan's attempt at a soft landing,...
The Greening of Giuliani
Mark Green, New York City's official nag, gets relevant. This June found New York City's crusading public advocate Mark Green courting financial support fundraising comedy gala in honor of his 55th birthday. To raise around $1 million for his 2001...
The Spiritual Is Political
Confronted with low voter participation rates and high levels of ignorance about politics and policy, many of us regularly bemoan the apparently apathetic American electorate. But we're mostly concerned with the apathy of people whom we imagine as...
The Taxonomist
KAY BAILEY FOREHEAD Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison, the Republican from Texas, recently bragged that she was the key instigator in persuading the Senate Finance Committee, as part of its pending "marriage penalty reduction" bill, to raise the income...
The Two Tenors
The jazz critics love a horse race, especially when they help create it. The late 1950s saw what is arguably their greatest fabrication. Trumpeter Miles Davis, with his high-profile contract with Columbia Records (not to mention his impeccable style...