The American Prospect

A monthly political journal of liberal though. Contains articles that generate debate, further ideas, and set agendas; and provides a forum for working through the controversies and hard choices facing all Americans. Includes regular topics and features.

Articles from Vol. 12, No. 13, July 30

Bad Faith
Bishop Harold Ray is hopping mad. "There is open conflict between what's being said and what's being done," he fumes. Ray, an African American, is talking about President Bush's program to give churches tax dollars to run social services--specifically,...
Beyond the Book
Cass Sunstein observes in his recent book Republic.com that both optimism and pessimism are "great obstacles to clear thinking about new technological developments." That's wise counsel from the eminent University of Chicago Law School professor, but...
Blowing It
Recent polls suggest that Vice President Dick Cheney's energy policies are out of touch with the American mainstream. But are they also out of step with George W. Bush's administration? The answer is yes--if the administration in question is the...
Bush's Climate Follies
By withdrawing from the Kyoto Protocol--the attempt by 160 nations to forge a treaty that will reduce worldwide emissions from coal combustion and oil burning, thus averting a global-warming catastrophe--President George W. Bush trashed years of work...
Correspondence
SCIENCE FICTION TO THE EDITORS: I want to clarify a remark of mine that John Judis quoted in his article "Science Fiction" [TAP, May 21, 2001]. Judis states that support for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is growing disproportionately...
Drug Dealer
The meanest man in Congress is the pharmaceutical industry's sweetheart. When Eli Lilly, the $10-billion pharmaceutical giant, was deciding last year where to invest its campaign contributions most profitably, an obvious was Representative Bill...
Drug Stupor
The Democrats have had a pretty good month. President Bush has been unable to hold Republican legislators on an array of issues ranging from oil drilling to stem cell research. Particularly sweet was the Senate's passage of the patients-rights bill,...
Epidemic Proportions
Money isn't enough to keep infectious diseases under control. The United Nations has made global public health a top priority. At April s anti-AIDS summit in Abuja, Nigeria, UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan spelled out what is needed in order to...
Live, Laugh, Love
Art about art is not a postmodernist invention. What the critic Harold Bloom has called "the anxiety of influence" underlies works from Vermeer's The Art of Painting to Eliot's The Waste Land. The postmodernist twist is partly a question of form, partly...
Pretty in Pink
In the black-and-white introduction to Chinese director Zhang Yimou's award-winning film The Road Home, a citified businessman returns, with down parka and four-wheel drive, to the remote mountain village where he grew up. His father has just died,...
Privatization, Inc
As the President's Commission to Strengthen Social Security prepares to issue its pro-privatization report this fall, expect the airwaves to be filled with an alphabet soup of groups staking out positions favoring or opposing the president's plan....
Right Place, Right Times
Careful readers of a very brief item in a recent issue of The New York Times may have been a little startled to learn that the latest addition to the Times editorial board is a 26-year-old prodigy named Daniel Altman. He succeeds Michael Weinstein,...
The A.G. Is Their Shepherd
When Attorney General John Ashcroft began conducting daily prayer sessions with Justice Department employees, he confirmed the hopes of religious conservatives and the fears of secularists: The new Republican regime would make government more godly....
The Broken Machinery of Death
No longer can a jury wantonly and freakishly impose the death sentence; it is always circumscribed by the legislative guidelines. --Gregg v. Georgia Twenty-five years ago this month, on July 2, 1976, the U.S. Supreme Court voted 7-2 in Gregg...
The Rebirth of the Democratic Party
Democratic activists are pushing for a midterm convention next summer. The party hasn't met at midterm for more than two decades. But activists make a convincing case for rallying the troops next year before the 2002 midterm elections and using the...
The Taxonomist
SIC TRANSIT UBERTAS In early June, the Congressional Budget Office quietly lowered its estimate of this year's budget surplus. Rather than the $96-billion excess predicted in January (excluding Social Security and Medicare), the CBO now projects...
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