The American Prospect

A monthly political journal of liberal though. Contains articles that generate debate, further ideas, and set agendas; and provides a forum for working through the controversies and hard choices facing all Americans. Includes regular topics and features.

Articles from No. 39, July-August

After Genocide: Building Peace in Bosnia
On a quiet Sunday last March, the Bosnian town of Brcko prepared to meet its fate. Its politicians and leading citizens gathered with international diplomats to await a lawyer's word from Washington. American troops stationed in Brcko stood ready...
Age of Irony
The dictum that historic events occur twice--first as tragedy, then as farce--has never been much use except as an insult to alleged second-timers. More and more, though, it is true of popular culture. For about six years now, beginning with the Saturday...
Ballot Blocks: What Gets the Poor to the Polls?
Election day in New York City, November 4, 1997. A cold wind whips through the streets of East Harlem, but sun peeks through billowy clouds and rain is nowhere in sight. A chipper young campaign worker stands on the comer of 125th Street handing out...
Charter Conundrum
Charter schools probably will not settle the education wars, but they may provide an armistice. Conservative privatizers see charter schools as a next-best alternative to voucher plans, which have now lost political momentum; progressive educators,...
Devil in the Details
Lest we forget, the vast universe of sexual allegations swirling around President Clinton began expanding more than four years ago with a single fiery Big Bang--the article by David Brock in the American Spectator called "His Cheatin' Heart." Last...
Rampant Bull: Social Security and the Market
In 1981, a young aide to Ronald Reagan named Peter Ferrara proposed a scheme to privatize Social Security. At the time, a serious shortfall was projected in the system's long-term financing, Even at his zenith, however, Reagan knew better than to...
Screening out Sex: Kids, Computers, and the New Censors
Would a teenager be harmed by reading Angels in America, the Pulitzer Prize-winning Broadway play? What about viewing erotic Indian sculptures? Or discussing sex in an internet chat room? What harm to minors do various kinds of sexual speech actually...
The American Recovery
Does the story of America in the twentieth century have a happy ending? From the late 1960s until recently, many of us didn't think so. The lesson of Vietnam, Watergate, rising crime rates, and slowing economic growth seemed to be that America had...
The Care Equation
Our family care system is collapsing. When it worked well, it depended on the unpaid labor of women at home. Now that we've lost a great part of that labor force and only marginally replaced it, our society has no new philosophic consensus for an...
The Clash of Samuel Huntingtons
Since the end of the Cold War, two opposing schools of thought on American foreign policy have emerged. The first school consists of what we might call triumphalists. Triumphalists argue that America has an obligation to democratize the world. For...
The Color of the Law
Is America now finally ready for the message of Randall Kennedy's new book--that in enforcing the criminal laws, the courts and the police should never be allowed to make judgments based on race? Eliminating racial bias from law enforcement was one...
The Turnout Imperative
With no presidential contest to focus public attention, voter turnout this year promises to fall once again, to less than one-third of the electorate by some estimates--and low turnout generally means that blue-collar workers, the lower middle class,...
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