The American Prospect

A monthly political journal of liberal though. Contains articles that generate debate, further ideas, and set agendas; and provides a forum for working through the controversies and hard choices facing all Americans. Includes regular topics and features.

Articles from No. 41, November-December

Charters and Choice
JOE NATHAN Rosa Parks--yes, that Rosa Parks--recently applied to open a charter school in Detroit. That's one of many things omitted in Richard Rothstein's critique of the charter public school movement ["Charter Conundrum," TAP, July-August...
Defining Democracy Down
In a democracy, we are supposed to treat each other as equals and with mutual respect. Does that mean that the Catholic Church must admit women as priests? Must families with children or pets be allowed to live in every homeowners' association? Should...
Devil in the Details
H&IRS BLOCK During the 1998 tax filing season, 25.5 million Americans filed their returns electronically--ten million more than just the year before. Of those 25.5 million taxpayers, one million used commercial software to file their returns...
Elephantiasis: The Weakness in the Republican Coalition
Though it now seems likely that the Republicans will retain--and perhaps expand--their narrow majority in the House of Representatives, the House GOP caucus remains riddled with vexatious regional and ideological divisions. The din of presidential...
Look at Me! Leave Me Alone!
It's a beautiful fantasy, really, and a potent one right about now: you are sailing through stormy weather to the edge of this bright, false, pretty world, and ramming suddenly into what all of your life you had mistaken for the sky but turns out...
Oversight in the Republican Congress: Hearing Loss
Newt Gingrich's Contract with America was mainly a legislative manifesto. But the landmark 1994 election also gave Republicans control of congressional oversight and investigative duties. To oversimplify only slightly, Republican congressional hearings...
Rape of the Appalachians
Driving his battered sedan through Blair, West Virginia, a cigarette dangling between thin fingers, James Weekley passes among ghosts. "There stood three houses," he says, gesturing at a fiat, grassy area below the narrow, two-lane road, "and across...
Sovereign Myopia
The United States delegation had just lost a crucial vote at the United Nations conference on an International Criminal Court (ICC), and to many ears the applause in the Rome conference room quickly took on a bitter edge. The American diplomats in...
The Bankers' Regime
Democracy has turned upside down, of late. At this writing, the nation is mesmerized by Oval Sex and related scandal. Elected representatives in Washington are talking about little else. The presidency is under siege. Cable television and talk radio...
The Black-White Test Score Gap
The question of persistent racial differences in tested cognitive ability has long been politically awkward for liberals. In "America's Next Achievement Test," which appeared in our September-October 1998 issue, Christopher Jencks and Meredith Phillips...
The Successor Generation: American Politics as a Family Business
"As a democracy," historian Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., once insisted, "the United States ought presumably to be able to dispense with dynastic families." Well, you'd never know it by looking at the November ballot. This is shaping up as a...
The Treadmill Economy
There is no denying that the United States economy has been growing at an impressive rate over the past two years. Since the end of 1995, gross domestic product (discounted for inflation) has risen at an annual rate of more than 4 percent. Meanwhile,...
Why Americans Go Broke
Inflation is under control and unemployment is at a 25-year low. Corporate profits and the Dow Jones Industrial Average have, at least until recently, been soaring. Despite the spreading "Asian Flu" and the stock market's recent queasiness, many economists...
Will Libraries Survive
In a Washington Post interview a couple of years ago, Bill Gates discussed his plans to give away the bulk of his fortune and suggested he already had in mind doing with the personal computer "something like what Carnegie did with libraries where...
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