The American Prospect

A monthly political journal of liberal though. Contains articles that generate debate, further ideas, and set agendas; and provides a forum for working through the controversies and hard choices facing all Americans. Includes regular topics and features.

Articles from Vol. 15, No. 10, October

2000, the Sequel: In Theory, the Help America Vote Act Was Congress' Attempt to Prevent the Catastrophes of the Last Election from Happening Again. in Fact, It May Have Made Things Even Worse
SAM HEYWARD THOUGHT HE'D PAID HIS DEBT. A tall, soft-spoken 45-year-old man from Tallahassee, Florida, Heyward was convicted in 1981 of a felony for buying furniture he knew was stolen. He spent a year in a prison work camp and then tried to rebuild...
525, 526, 527
IF GEORGE W. BUSH TRULY believes that "shadowy 527" groups (independent campaign organizations established under Section 527 of the taxcode) are "bad for the system," the last few weeks must have driven him batty. New 527s are forming at a rate of...
A Lawless State: How to Restore America's Global Standing as a Beacon of Freedom-Both Internationally and with Its Own Citizenry
THERE'S A PARADOX AT THE heart of U.S. foreign policy: As the Bush administration asserts unilateral global power, the influence and respect of the United States hits rock bottom, and as the United States professes its desire to expand democratic rights...
Buckeye Blues: Ohio Has 19 Percent of the Nation's Lost Jobs since Bush Took Office. So Why Is Kerry in Trouble There? Because the State Has Lost Something Else, Too
LORAIN, OHIO -- THE STEELWORKERS hall here is a musty monument to American labor's glorious past. On the walls are photos of Franklin Roosevelt signing the Wagner Act in 1935, and of Philip Murray, president of the United Steelworkers of America from...
Domestic Abuse: How the U.S. Government Is Violating Native Americans' Human Rights
PICKSTOWN, S.D.-- SANDY WADE WAS 6 WHEN SHE was sent away to St. Paul's Indian Mission, a boarding school overseen by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) on the Yankton Sioux reservation. At first, things weren't so bad. She got three meals a day--a...
Economic Security: A Human Right Reclaiming Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Second Bill of Rights
ARE SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC RIGHTS FOREIGN TO AMERICAN TRADITIONS? Are they inconsistent with our laissez-faire freedom-loving culture? Consider a defining moment in out nation's history, when national security was also threatened and when an American...
Ernesto Goes to the Movies: The Motorcycle Diaries, Brought to the Screen by Robert Redford, Shows Us the Young, Pre-Revolutionary Guevara. Call It Soft Socialist Realism
HE WAS, PER JEAN-PAUL SARTRE, "the most complete human being of our age." Not to be outdone, Susan Sontag eulogized him as "the clearest, most unequivocal image of the humanity of the world-wide revolutionary struggle unfolding today." He, of course,...
From the Front Lines: A Review of Recent Reports on Human Rights
EARLY IN THE CLINTON ADMINistration, the United Nations Human Rights Commission was holding hearings in New York on the compliance of various member states--including, for the first time, the United States--with the International Covenant on Civil...
George W. and Human Rights
In his new book, Washington's Crossing, historian David Hackett Fischer recounts how humane treatment of prisoners was literally invented by George Washington on the battlefield in late 1776. Official British policy was to let field commanders decide...
Gitmo Justice
TO THE RELIEF OF MOST OF civilization, the Supreme Court ruled in June that the United States has an obligation to grant the roughly 585 detainees held at Guantanamo Bay (aka Gitmo) an opportunity to challenge their status before a "neutral decision...
Good Medicine: Medicare Does Need Changes. but Its Expansion Is the Key to Eventual Universal Coverage
ACROSS THE POLITICAL SPECTRUM, ALARM BELLS ARE ringing about Medicare, America's giant health program for the aged and disabled. To conservatives, Medicare is a huge, Kremlin-esque bureaucracy destined to soak up more and more of the American economy....
Health Care's Big Choice: As Family Premiums Push $10,000, Bush and Kerry Promote Radically Different Proposals
The American health-care system is again at a point of critical change as a result of escalating costs and a gathering movement among employers, insurers, and policy-makers to revamp the structure of health insurance. Like the spread of managed care...
Holding America Accountable: Why the United States Should Take Human-Rights Obligations Seriously
ELEANOR ROOSEVELT, THE MOTHER OF THE INTERNATIONAL HUMAN-RIGHTS movement, famously said: "Where do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home. So close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world. Yet they are the...
Idiot Boxed: One Big Reason Bush Won Florida? Television (Prematurely) Said He Did. by 2001, Red-Faced Network News Honchos Promised Big Changes for 2004. Now We're Here. and Guess What?
THERE WAS PLENTY OF HUMILIATION TO GO AROUND IN the aftermath of the 2000 elections. Vote counters and ballot designers, election boards and state legislatures all came in for heavy criticism. But special ignominy was reserved for the five major broadcast...
Inalienable Rights: Can Human-Rights Law Help to End U.S. Mistreatment of Noncitizens?
THE UNITED STATES, FAMOUS AS A nation of immigrants, should also be infamous for its bouts of anti-immigrant sentiment. Often our intolerance has been fueled by national-security fears. At other times, Americans have made misguided assumptions about...
International Holdout: Around the World, Empowering Women Is Considered Essential. So Why Isn't America on Board?
TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO this December, the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), a global "bill of rights" that is both visionary and comprehensive. In the...
Into the Bright Sunshine: The Value of Human Rights in the United States
THE MOST OBVIOUS VALUE of human rights to the post-Holocaust world has been to set a limit on government power and shine a light on its abuses. The limit comes from the revolutionary idea, conceived in the immediate aftermath of World War II, that...
Iraq the Vote: This Month, to Prepare for Next January's Elections, Monitors Begin Heading off to Iraq. or at Least to the Parts of Iraq That Are Safe Enough for Elections
THE MOST IMPORTANT ELECTION IN determining the future of U.S. policy in the Middle East may not be the one happening on November 2. Sometime in the 10 days after the victor takes the presidential oath of office on January 20, another election will...
Long Division: America Is Not Split over the Vietnam War. but Karl Rove Needs You to Believe That It Is
AROUND ABOUT THE THIRD WEEK OF THE "SWIFT"-BOAT controversy, commentators began to note, in a tone of disapproving sadness, that the firestorm created by the accusations against John Kerry proved that three decades later, the nation was still hopelessly...
Minimal Monitors
THOROUGH ELECTION MONitoring is a staple in countries recovering from long periods of civil strife. In post-conflict zones such as Bosnia, East Timor, and Haiti, large numbers of foreign experts and trained local monitors have been instrumental in...
Now for Some Bad News
Read my lips: I'll raise your taxes--a lot. Thus, paraphrased only slightly, speaks George W. Bush to Middle America. Yet many of his intended middle-class victims don't seem to hold it against him. Or perhaps they haven't been listening hard enough....
On America's Double Standard: The Good and Bad Faces of Exceptionalism
WHEN THE UNITED STATES HOLDS TALIBAN detainees at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, without Geneva Convention hearings, then decries the failure of others to accord Geneva Convention protections to their American prisoners, it supports a double standard. When...
Rights in an Insecure World: Why National Security and Civil Liberty Are Complements
ALMOST AS SOON AS THE PLANES CRASHED INTO THE TWIN TOWERS, SCHOLARS, pundits, and politicians began asserting that our most important challenge as a democracy now is to reassess the balance between liberty and security. As Harvard human-rights scholar...
Shame in Our Own House: How Segregation and Racism Have Fed U.S. Resistance to International Human-Rights Treaties
IN ITS RELATIONS WITH THE REST OF THE WORLD, AMERICA STRUGGLES WITH A profound contradiction. On the one hand, our country has been a pioneer in the human-rights movement, providing much of the language and inspiration for international efforts to...
The A-Team: After Six Weeks of Battering, John Kerry Learned the Importance of a Tough and Experienced Communications Operation. but Did He Learn It in Time?
UNLESS YOU SPENT THE SUMMER ORbiting with the Genesis space capsule, you know that John Kerry had a lousy August and a brutal early September. Thanks to the attacks of the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth and the masterfully orchestrated Republican national...
The Partial Rule of Law: America's Opposition to the ICC Is Self-Defeating and Hypocritical
SLOBODAN MILOSEVIC IS IN THE dock for war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide. For all the delays and procedural maneuvering, his trial marks a milestone in the extraordinary development of international criminal law from Nuremberg forward....
The Road to Abu Ghraib: How the United States Played a Large Role in Creating International Human Rights-And Then Abandoning Them
FROM THE LAST, BEST HOPE OF earth to Abu Ghraib: What has happened to the vision of America as the land of justice? In countless ways, at home and in the world, this country has abandoned its commitment to the protection of human rights. The change...
What We Expect from America
U.S. LEADERSHIP WAS CRITical in building the global human-rights agenda from the ground up, beginning with the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. More than half a century later, that agenda and the movement it inspired are in need of renewed...
Where Are the Rational Greedy Bastards?
Why is big business so enthusiastic about another Bush term? Yes, corporations have gotten a few fat tax breaks and regulatory rollbacks, and more face time with the president than do White House security guards. But on the issues that count, the current...
While You Were Sleeping
It wasn't the oil, it wasn't the neocons, and it wasn't a dream of democratic transformation throughout the Middle East. It turns out that the decision to invade Iraq may have been based on a simple case of mistaken identity. As Donald Rumsfeld...
Will Unions Exist?
AMONG THE ISSUES TO BE determined by the upcoming presidential election, there's the little item of the right of workers to secure a union. As things now stand, the Bush-appointed majority on the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) may just relegate...
Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.