The American Prospect

A monthly political journal of liberal though. Contains articles that generate debate, further ideas, and set agendas; and provides a forum for working through the controversies and hard choices facing all Americans. Includes regular topics and features.

Articles from Vol. 21, No. 8, October

A Long Haul: How the Government's Policy to Modernize Trucks Collides with Its Policy to Promote High-Wage Jobs
The Obama administration has defined the misclassification of employed workers as independent contractors to be an important problem resulting in workers losing legal protections and benefits, and governments losing tax revenue and insurance contributions...
Care for the Caregivers: Child-Care Providers Have Long Been Thought of as Full-Time Baby Sitters. the Government Can Help Them Become Weft-Paid Professionals
Being a child-care provider in the U.S. often means living b at the edges of poverty. The average salary for the nation's 2.3 million child-care workers is $19,605, according to the National Association of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies,...
Finding Our Inner Republican: The GOP's Website Reminds Us How Grand the Old Party Used to Be-Eons Ago
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] We worry here at the Prospect about whether we give the Republican Party a fair shake. OK, we don't worry about it a lot. But when our attention was called to the "Accomplishments" section of the official Republican National...
Gatekeepers: Is Giving Away Money-And Lots of It-Really the Best Way to Change the World?
In Pune, India, a shiny van cruised the red-light district, canvassing local brothels. The van was brand-new; the driver was a stranger. Fearing that the state police had dispatched the official-looking vehicle, the prostitutes, some of whom were HIV...
Holding Wal-Mart Accountable: The Road to a Unionized Wal-Mart Runs through Obscure Towns Where Workers Are Abused in Hidden Warehouses
Nobody, it seems, is responsible for the conditions of work in the warehouses of Fontana--even though warehouse work is mainly what Fontana has to offer. The Los Angeles exurb is part of California's Inland Empire, which boasts the world's largest...
Humanoid Rights: The ACLU Looks to Science Fiction to Prepare for Future Threats to Civil Liberties
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] A few months ago I watched Moon, a 2009 indie science-fiction film, with a friend who works on public relations for the American Civil Liberties Union. The movie centers on Sam Bell, a solitary laborer who spends his days...
Is a Longer School Day a Better School Day?
MONICA POTTS: Lots of school districts are extending the school day, especially in lower-income areas, to boost student performance and close the achievement gap. And Education Secretary Arne Duncan recently called for a 12-hour school day. I say the...
October Surprises for 2010
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] NEWT GINGRICH apologizes for earlier comments about the Cordoba House community center. "My implicit comparison of Muslims to Nazis was pretty offensive, even to myself," Gingrich explains. "Not only do I regret what I said....
On Progressive Populism
Since our founding two decades ago, the Prospect has published many articles on the importance of pocketbook issues in restoring progressivism as this country's governing philosophy. During this period, jobs, earnings, pensions, health coverage, and...
Rewards in the Rubble: With the Fight Policies, Turning Foreclosed Properties into Decent Homes Could Provide High-Wage Employment
The implosion of the housing bubble continues to leave communities with unprecedented numbers of foreclosed homes. The question of what to do with them is sparking a range of ideas and proposals for reclaiming these homes as affordable housing. That...
Sweatshop Army: Why Does the Pentagon Use Low-Road Companies to Feed and Clothe Our Troops?
During a 13-month tour in Iraq with her National Guard unit, Amber Hicks ate her share of the military rations known as "meals ready to eat," or MREs. Then, as chance would have it, she returned to her hometown of Cincinnati and found a job in the...
The Case for Presidential Action: There Is a Lot the Administration Can Do without Legislation
For more than three decades, the wages of American workers have been close to flat while economic insecurity has risen massively. Although the productivity of the U.S. economy has doubled in a generation, most of those gains have not been captured...
The Forever Culture War
In a long and often-cited Atlantic cover story published during the 2008 presidential race, Andrew Sullivan announced that he was supporting Barack Obama because his election would put an end to "the war within America that has prevailed since Vietnam...
The Hands That Feed Us: Some of the Worst Abuses Are in Food-Processing and Farming Work-Where Government Is a Huge Purchaser
Because so little has changed, her years in the fields seem to melt together. She works under abusive crew bosses and beside people who are sick but cannot take time off to get care. She works alongside youngsters less than 12-years-old, the U.S. legal...
The Path to a High-Wage Society: The Explosion of Low-Wage Jobs Is Due, for the Most Part, to the Declining Bargaining Power of America's Employees
American workers today face declining job security and dwindling earnings as companies downsize, move overseas, and shift more jobs to part-time workers. Last year, a survey by the Economic Policy Institute found that 44 percent of American families...
The Peter Principle: Republicans Have Found the Perfect Spokesman for a Substance-Free Election
What they say about Pete Sessions is that he's a hard worker. It took him three tries to get into Congress, but get elected he did in 1996. Then it took him two attempts to win the chairmanship of the National Republican Congressional Committee, but...
The Power to Act: There Is Well-Established Legal Authority for Much Stronger Presidential Action to Promote Good Jobs
The Employee Free Choice Act is a low priority for the White House and Congress. Legislation mandating a minimum number of paid sick days for all workers couldn't even get congressional action when the country was facing the public-health scares of...
Uncertainly Wrong
The buzzword of this election year, at least for Republicans, is uncertainty. House Republican Leader John Boehner uses the word at every opportunity: Small-business operators ... are filled with massive uncertainty." "When there is that much uncertainty...
Whose Media Bias? Progressives' Attempt to Reshape the Media Has Had Some Successes, but the Failures May Be More Instructive
When Air America finally shut its doors early this year, it wasn't front-page news. Plagued by mismanagement and multiple ownership changes, the progressive radio network had failed to turn its respectable ratings into profits, even though it made...
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