The American Prospect

A monthly political journal of liberal though. Contains articles that generate debate, further ideas, and set agendas; and provides a forum for working through the controversies and hard choices facing all Americans. Includes regular topics and features.

Articles from No. 37, March-April

Are U.S. Students Behind?
The conventional wisdom is now firmly established: American students can't hold their own against their peers in other nations. They can't read, they can't do math, they are abysmally ignorant of science. That has been the message of countless stories...
Globalism Bites Back
The Asian financial crisis is a practical rebuttal to the naive internationalism that is America's foreign economic policy. Naive globalism includes these precepts: * The freest possible movement of goods and services maximizes economic efficiency,...
Labor's Stake in the WTO
When seven years of trade negotiations at last gave birth to the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 1995, the U.S. labor movement was one of its leading skeptics. A world trade organization, labor supporters argued, would only accelerate the headlong...
March of Folly: U.S. Immigration Policy after NAFTA
On January 1, 1994, Mexico joined Canada and the United States in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), creating a free trade zone stretching from the Guatemala border to the Arctic Ocean. Despite the continent-wide opening of capital,...
New Page, Old Lesson: Why Educational Standards Fail the Political Test
In February of 1997, when Bill Clinton made national school standards and testing a centerpiece of his second-term domestic program, it became one of the biggest applause lines of his State of the Union address. What could be more self-evident for...
Should Buckley Be Overturned?
Dear Alan: The Supreme Court's decision in Buckley v. Valeo (1976) to strike campaign spending caps is one of the most bitterly criticized rulings of the century. You are right to urge Buckley's many detractors to consider the broad implications of...
The Buses Don't Stop Here Anymore: Sick Transit and How to Fix It
It's hard to imagine a dense city without mass transit, and not just because the urban ideal--people of all classes, creeds, and nationalities amicably rubbing shoulders--is realized most literally on the trains of an urban rail system. Urban densities...
The God of the Digerati
"No ambition, however extravagant, no fantasy, however outlandish, can any longer be dismissed as crazy or impossible. This is the age when you can finally do it all. . . . You can become whatever you want to be." This bold invitation stretches across...
The IMF and the Asian Flu
The International Monetary Fund has displayed its awesome power in recent months in assuming the central role in the unfolding Asian financial crisis. Since July, the IMF has organized financial bailouts totaling more than $100 billion of public...
The Other American Dilemma
A couple of hundred pages into the rich and sprawling narrative of Big Trouble, Anthony Lukas quotes an Irish-born union president named Ed Boyce who, one day in 1902, was moved to lay down the facts of life for his members: "There are only two classes...
The Real Electorate
Recently released data from the Bureau of the Census now reveal a picture of the voting public in 1996 that is substantially different from the one that was available immediately after the election. Initially, analysts believed the electorate was...
The Wrong Enemy: Why We Shouldn't Fear Low-Wage Imports
The economic development of poor countries is heavily dependent on their ability to export. But many American liberals are troubled, wrongly in my view, that commerce with low-wage countries will infect our own body politic. Rather than worrying so...
Why Liberalism Fled the City ... and How It Might Come Back
If you want to view the political decay of American liberalism, look at its spawning ground--the great cities. In the late 1990s, there simply are no remaining strongholds of municipal liberalism. In Boston, Mayor Thomas Menino has managed to retain...