The American Prospect

A monthly political journal of liberal though. Contains articles that generate debate, further ideas, and set agendas; and provides a forum for working through the controversies and hard choices facing all Americans. Includes regular topics and features.

Articles from No. 34, September-October

An Invisible Community: Inside Chicago's Public Housing
Chicago's plans for restructuring its public housing developments and ending the "nightmare" of high-rise public housing living are ambitious: construction of large mixed-income residential developments; guaranteed relocation of displaced tenants;...
Dr. Business
Health care remains one of the most intractable domestic problems facing the United States today. To compound the issue, there isn't even agreement on what health care really is, or what it ought to be. To most physicians, like me, it involves at...
Family Trouble
BARBARA DAFOE WHITEHEAD In a review essay that purports to include my book, The Divorce Culture, Arlene Skolnick ignores what the book actually says. Instead, she falsely ascribes to me things I have never written. Let me begin with some of...
Grassroots Medicine
For several decades, researchers have sought to determine whether marijuana has legitimate medical uses, and narcotics control agencies have discouraged them from finding out. Now a new round of federally funded research may provide some answers--or...
Labor and the Intellectuals
In the fall of 1996, Columbia University held a famous teach-in on the suddenly popular topic of relations between intellectuals and the labor movement, and because my name figured on the advertised list of speakers, the National Writers Union...
Legacy Gone Awry
It's almost unfair to heap more scorn on top of John F. Kennedy, Jr.'s oft-ridiculed political glossy George, but after opening its July issue to a Letterman-esque feature, "Oops! Top 10 Laws That Lashed Back," it's impossible not to say something....
Skyboxed In
In 1995, the NFL's Cleveland Browns abandoned Ohio for greener pastures in Maryland, illustrating a basic fact about professional sports today: Money talks and teams walk. Browns owner Arthur Modell moved his team to Baltimore when the city offered...
Taking Stock
Washington has a curious intellectual dynamic: The less understood an idea is, the faster it spreads. On May 9, a Wall Street journal op-ed by Lawrence Kudlow announced that cutting the capital gains tax would balance the budget immediately. Within...
Test the Limit
It has been amusing to watch the natural rate of unemployment come down. Two years ago, the community of respectable economists held--though with exceptions including Robert Eisner of Northwestern , Ray Fair at Yale, Harvard's James Medoff, and myself--that...
The China Hawks
Since the end of the Cold War, the main challenge to those who favor a "constructive engagement" with China has come from human rights advocates and labor leaders. But in the last year, a new opposition voice has been heard, arguing for a return to...
The End of Unemployment?
Whether our current, relatively low unemployment rates can be sustained without increasing inflation has been a point of contention among economists, financial market analysts, and policymakers. Arguments over trade-offs between unemployment and inflation,...
The Martian Plan
Newt Gingrich thinks Americans need a new frontier to explore. He also believes in paying bounties to promote public objectives. Hence the proposal prepared at his invitation by space entrepreneur Robert Zubrin for a federal bounty of $20 billion...
The Moral Meanings of Work
In November 1996, truck drivers in France waged a strike that, in a fashion typical of that country's industrial relations, quickly produced a gridlocked society. Barely resisting, the French government settled with the truckers, granting their major...
The Mythology of Centrism: Why Clinton and Blair Really Won
When Tony Blair and Bill Clinton held a joint press conference in the Rose Garden at 10 Downing Street in London on May 29, they might just as well have been standing in a place called the "radical center" or "dead center," to judge from the accounts...
The Neglected Remedy: Strengthening Consumer Voice in Managed Care
Managed care seems finally to have done what health care reformers a few years ago couldn't accomplish: stir demands for more government regulation. After some health maintenance organizations cut hospital maternity stays to a maximum of 24 hours,...
The New Urban Gamble
When it comes to abject poverty, few cities rival East St. Louis, Illinois. Of the approximately 40,000 residents there, 98 percent of whom are black, roughly half qualify for public assistance. Forty-four percent of the population lives below the...
The Speed Limit: Fact and Fancy in the Growth Debate
"Say it ain't so, Joe," a young boy is reputed to have implored Shoeless Joe Jackson, the tarnished star of the infamous Chicago "Black Sox" in 1919. That same cry went up in February 1997 when the Council of Economic Advisers, then headed by Joseph...
Wayne's World
Our text, fittingly enough, is the editorial page of the Wall Street Journal. At the top of the page for June 3 is an essay by Wayne Angell, the former governor of the Federal Reserve. "Over the past 15 years stock prices in the U.S. have risen at...
Why We Can Grow Faster
From the early-nineteenth-century introduction of steam power through the dawning of the age of the microchip in the post-World War II era, real economic growth in America averaged 3.8 percent per year. That meant economic output doubled roughly every...
With Friends like These
Republicans in Congress have been trumpeting a series of "family-friendly" amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act, including a proposal to allow workers to take an hour and a half of paid compensatory time off in lieu of receiving standard overtime...
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