The American Prospect

A monthly political journal of liberal though. Contains articles that generate debate, further ideas, and set agendas; and provides a forum for working through the controversies and hard choices facing all Americans. Includes regular topics and features.

Articles from Vol. 20, No. 9, November

Can Community Colleges Rise to the Occasion? Yes-With Fundamental Internal Reforms and a New Vision of Their Role in Higher Education
Last summer President Barack Obama proposed a 10-year, $12 billion initiative to increase significantly the number of community college graduates. He made the announcement at Macomb Community College, where he was introduced by Joe Iezzi, a 54-year-old...
Constant Comment: How Kathleen Parker Became America's Most-Read Woman Columnist
Save the Males, Kathleen Parker's 2008 polemic on sexual permissiveness and libertinism, contains the following euphemisms for vagina: "inner sanctum," "familiars," "you know what," "very private parlor," "sacred vessel," "vestal vestibule," and "hirsute...
Girls Just Wanna Have Fangs: The Unwarranted Backlash against Fans of the World's Most Popular Vampire-Romance Series
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] When New Moon, the second film adaptation of Stephenie Meyer's four-part Twilight series, opens in theaters this month, those who see it will not be getting great art. The faults of Meyer's immensely popular teen vampire-romance...
Grand Solution or Grab Bag? Community Colleges Are Being Asked to Provide Everything from Second Chances to Vocational Education. Is America Ready to Help Them Succeed?
In July, as U.S. automakers were emerging from bankruptcy, President Barack Obama dramatically announced the American Graduation Initiative at Macomb Community College, some 12 miles from Detroit, calling for a massive federal investment of $12 billion...
Harry, Louise, and Barack
What are our fondest hopes and worst fears for the health legislation now slouching towards the president's desk? On the plus side, it will cover slightly more than half of America's uninsured, qualify more of the near-poor for Medicaid, and it may...
Ideas from the Other Washington: Policy Reforms to Increase Student Success
Community colleges, far more than four-year colleges, serve groups that will dominate our undergraduate student populations and our work force for decades to come: students on their own financially, older students, people of color, parents, first-generation...
It's Not Just Education: If We Want More Economic Opportunity and Equality, a Better-Skilled Work Force Is Only One Element among Many
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The vast inequalities in American society, even in prosperous times, include correlated inequalities in income, wealth, security, health, occupation, and education. We need policies to remedy each of these inequalities; addressing...
Let's Make a Deal!
LET'S MAKE A DEAL! Sarah Laskow checks out some of the health-care lobbying efferots. INFLUENCE DEMANDS AARP AARP, an AARP's membership organization for splits evenly along ...
Our Two-Class System: The Recession Has Worsened Already Widening Inequalities of Access and Affordability in Higher Education. Could It Also Trigger a New Grand Bargain?
The recession has been a double whammy for universities and parents, leaving colleges more dependent on tuition revenue while making it harder for families to pay the tab. Parents have lost their jobs, plummeting stock prices have decimated their college...
Rationing College Opportunity: Many More Young People Could Succeed at College If Given the Chance. but Public Policy Has Been Raising Hurdles Rather Than Increasing Access
Americans put great stock in the promise of a college education. Most adults see a degree as important for personal success, and they are right. Social and economic data confirm that individuals benefit from college. Communities gain, too. College...
Saying Yes in Syracuse: A Battered Industrial City Is Leading the Way in Preparing All Schoolchildren to Succeed in College
The debate over what it takes to get low-income kids ready for college, and then to actually earn a degree, has long been polarized. Some argue that better schools alone can ensure that such students are ready to enter and finish college. Others see...
Term-Paper Trail
"Every level of government should statutorily and procedurally prefer married couples over cohabitators, homosexuals, or fornicators." --highlight from the 1989 graduate thesis of Virginia gubernatorial candidate Robert F. McDonnell Other highlights...
The Canadian Way of War: Can We Learn to Fight from Our Staid Northern Neighbors?
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] It was a public-relations stunt worthy of P.T. Barnum, perfect for getting the attention of a uninterested American audience: Tuck an Afghan village, complete with authentic Afghans, into the heart of Washington, D.C., right...
The Graduation Gap: America Needs to Do a Much Better Job of Increasing Its College Enrollment and Graduation Rates, Especially for Less Advantaged Students
American higher education, once the envy of the world, is losing its competitive edge. Most of the world's top universities are still located in the United States, but our other great accomplishment, making higher education available to an ever-larger...
The High Cost of Working Hard: Why Students Need to Work Less and Study More
As post secondary education has become nearly essential for getting a decent job and entering the middle class, it has become financially out of reach for many of America s young people. Costs have risen exponentially, while financial-aid policies...
The Innovation Administration: When It Comes to Social Policy, Is Newer Always Better?
Every single one of you has something you're good at," President Barack Obama told children in his Sept. 8 back-to-school address. He went on to list future occupations toward which students could strive--doctor, teacher, police officer, architect,...
The Myth of Too Big to Fail: When It Comes to Banking, Size Isn't the Only Thing That Matters
A mid last fall's financial chaos, executives from Wachovia, at the time the fourth-largest commercial bank in the country, had bad news for their regulators: They were broke. Federal officials deliberated and decided Wachovia was so important to the...
The Obstacles to Real Health-Care Reform
American presidents have tried seven times to bring us into the community of nations that provide health care to all citizens. Seven times the effort failed. More accurately, it was blocked. In the 1940s, the anti-reform movement was led by doctors,...
The Polanski Paradox
His year, violence against women--an issue doggedly championed by feminists but rarely a front-page story--seemed to make headlines in every section of the newspaper. Sports: A hotel worker accused Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger...
Title IX Dad
When it's her long-awaited turn to play an inning behind the plate, I rush over to my daughter and help her strap on her leg guards, chest protector, and mask and then watch as she does her best imitation of Jorge Posada, crouched unsmiling behind...
Twilight of the Op-Ed Columnist: What Is the Fate of the Syndicated Newspaper Columnist in a World Where Online Punditry Is Plentiful?
The influential French sociologist Gabriel Tarde wrote in 1898 that newspapers "both enriched and leveled ... the conversations of individuals, even those who do not read papers but who, talking to those who do, are forced to follow the groove of their...
Who Will Be the Next Supreme Court Nominee?
ADAM SERWER: With John Paul Stevens and Ruth Bader Ginsburg possibly retiring soon, we may be looking at another Supreme Court battle in the near future. Who should Obama nominate? SCOTT LEMIEUX: Well, there are a variety of things to consider,...
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