American Theatre

American Theatre is a magazine containing news, features and opinions on American and international theatre. Published six times a year by the Theatre Communications Group, this periodical was founded in 1984.Subjects for American Theatre include drama and theatre. Nicole Estvanik Taylor is the Managing Editor and Jim O' Quinn is the Editor-in-Chief.

Articles from Vol. 14, No. 4, April

20/20 Blake
A Byte of Blake In the case of William Blake, the word "visionary" is no piece of critical hyperbole: Blake claimed to receive visits in his garden from spirits who guided his art - rarely in orthodox directions. In 20/20 Blake, latter-day stage visionary...
Ballyhoo and Daisy, Too: Between the Lines with Alfred Uhry and Dana Ivey
Alfred Uhry's plays don't announce themselves with an air of importance. They don't come in cycles of three or ten, nor do they take all day to perform, like the epic works that have dominated end-of-the-century American playwriting. So their seriousness...
Breaking the Mold: Women in Japanese Theatre
A barefoot woman clothed in a backless white dress sits alone on a stool facing upstage. A man, fully clothed in a black suit, approaches her slowly from behind and begins striking her bare back with all his might. For some five minutes, as he delivers...
Chicago: The Musical
They Made Words Sing Like Roxie Hart, the homicidal jazz baby at the center of the musical Chicago, I'm older now than I ever intended to be. Old enough, in fact, to have caught Gwen Verdon, Chita Rivera and Jerry Orbach in the original 1975 Bob Fosse...
Courage & Conviction: Not-for-Profit Theatre and the NEA
Memory is short; history fades. At the end of the American century, oversaturated as we are with sounds, words and images we mistake for "information," we have a hard time distinguishing the contemporary from the permanent. Not-for-profit theatre, for...
"Lila, Meet Pogo. I Believe You Already Know Mr. Brecht." (Discussion on Race, Art and American Culture)
The risk of talking about race in public, Shelby Steele pointed out in the New Republic last year, is that whites will be called racist and blacks inferior. "We can all be shamed," he said, "by the same sad racial history that we work to overcome." Nevertheless,...
Lisa Peterson: A Bird on a Wire
November 1997: From among the numerous new plays running in the Los Angeles area, pick two. (Pay attention: there will be a quiz.) One is a West Coast premiere at East West Players, the Asian-American company in bohemian Silver Lake; the other, a world...
Mesmerised by Mielziner: A Designer's Thank-You
I first saw the work of Jo Mielziner on a family Christmas visit to the London production of Annie Get Your Gun - 1947, I think it was. I was just 13 and wholly ignorant of the magic of stagecraft. In fact, I'm embarrassed to admit that - far from appreciating...
Miss Julie
Bogarts Pins Strindberg to the Mat The role of Kristine in a production of Strindberg's avowedly misogynistic play Miss Julie may be one of the most depressing assignments for an actress in canonical drama. Unlike the glamorous and class-mobile woman...
Paul Owen: Resident Miracle Worker
One of the first things you notice about set designer Paul Owen is his soft southern accent, which pours into the ear like syrup over hardscrabble. The second quality you sense is a tremendous calm, even though it's mid-January and he's well into the...
Peter Schickele: Century-Hopping with P.D.Q. Bach
The name Peter Schickele will always be followed by an asterisk, of sorts - Peter Schickele, a.k.a. P.D.Q. Bach. In 1965, Schickele began what has become one of the most accomplished (and hilarious) satires in contemporary music when he announced his...
The Crucible
The new Nicholas Hytner film of The Crucible is not the first cinematic version of Arthur Miller's play. In 1957, Yves Montand and Simone Signoret played John and Elizabeth Proctor in French director Raymound Rouleau's Les Sorcieres de Salem, with a...
The Force Is with Her: Arts Advocate Lee Kessler Fights an Arduous Battle on Capitol Hill
Nor is it possible to devote oneself to culture and declare that one is 'not interested' in politics. - THOMAS MANN It's a blustery, gray February morning in Washington, D.C. There s a lethargic, bleak quality in the air; people, cars, even the famed...
The Power of Consensus
Representative Rick Lazio (R-N.Y.) has been one of the leading Republican supporters of the National Endowment for the Arts. Last summer, he initiated the notable "Dear Colleague" letter to Newt Gingrich which was co-signed by 28 other moderate Republican...
The Subject That Won't Go Away: Writing about AIDS Is Explored at a Literary Seminar in Key West
Two playwrights whose works bracket the theatrical response to the AIDS crisis in America - Larry Kramer, whose fierce polemic The Normal Heart thrust AIDS into wider public consciousness in 1984, and Tony Kushner, whose epic Angels in America eight...
Who Needs Artists?
America does, declares a distinguished media commentator America is creative or it is nothing. Americans created a nation and have been re-creating it ever since. American creativity in the arts and sciences may conceivably outlive the nation, but in...
Yip Sings Harburg
They Made Words Sing Like Roxie Hart, the homicidal jazz baby at the center of the musical Chicago, I'm older now than I ever intended to be. Old enough, in fact, to have caught Gwen Verdon, Chita Rivera and Jerry Orbach in the original 1975 Bob Fosse...