American Theatre

American Theatre is a magazine containing news, features and opinions on American and international theatre. Published six times a year by the Theatre Communications Group, this periodical was founded in 1984.Subjects for American Theatre include drama and theatre. Nicole Estvanik Taylor is the Managing Editor and Jim O' Quinn is the Editor-in-Chief.

Articles from Vol. 21, No. 7, September

A Fount of the Midwest: Its Active Theatre Scene May Well Be One of the Jewels in Kansas City's Crown
Goin' to Kansas City? Dress for the weather and pack a picnic basket. You might be surprised to find that within a few square miles of the prominent Spanish architecture--style fountains and spacious boulevards, a vibrant cultural scene has emerged,...
Awards & Prizes
Playwright Tina Howe will be honored with the William Inge Theatre Festival's distinguished achievement in American theatre award during a tribute at the Kansas-based festival's April 2005 outing. "Tina Howe is universally respected by her peers, has...
Backstage Chatter
MAKING IT ON BROADWAY: ACTORS' TALES OF CLIMBING TO THE TOP [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] by David Wiener and Jodie Langel, Allworth Press, New York City. 268 pp, $19.95 cloth. TRANS-GLOBAL READINGS: CROSSING THEATRICAL BOUNDARIES [ILLUSTRATION...
'Beast' Makes Tracks
Karlsruhe, Germany: Richard Kalinoski's 1998 drama Beast on the Moon, whose leading characters are a Milwaukee married couple who survived the Armenian genocide of 1915-16, has been produced in theatres across the U.S., and even more widely in Europe...
Days of Our Lives: In a Season of Decision, Artists and Their Companies Grapple with the Issues
"THE NATION'S MORALS ARE LIKE TEETH," the playwright and social commentator George Bernard Shaw once opined. "The more decayed they are, the more it hurts to touch them." As the country's political climate grows increasingly heated in the lead-up to...
Entrances & Exits
Veteran director Michael Bloom, head of directing at the University of Texas in Austin for the past eight years, assumes the artistic directorship of the Cleveland Play House this month. In addition to wide-ranging credits as a freelance director at...
Ionesco and Me: Honoring the Master in Two New American Translations
ON THE EVE OF IONESCO'S TRIUMPHANT 1960 LONDON OPENING OF RHINOCEROS (directed by Orson Welles and starring Laurence Olivier), the eminent critic Martin Esslin approached Madame Ionesco and remarked on how happy her husband must be. "On the contrary,"...
Johanna Schall All in the Family: Brecht's Granddaughter Challenges Some Well-Honed Traditions
Johanna Schall's sold-out production of The Threepenny Opera at Berlin's Maxim Gorki Theater opens with a little girl sneaking on stage holding a toy ship. From backstage a male voice calls out for Polly. Enter Mr. Peachum, who carries his errant daughter...
Los Angeles: Viennese Waltz
GUSTAV KLIMT GAVE HER HER FIRST KISS, and another Gustav--Mahler--was the first of her three husbands. From Vienna to Los Angeles, Alma Mahler-Werfel (nee Schindler) had a knack for being at the right place at the right time, and on the right man's...
Man from Nebraska
ABOUT THE PLAYWRIGHT Tracy Letts is the author of three plays, Man from Nebraska, which was produced at the Steppenwolf Theatre Company in 2003 and was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize; Killer Joe, which has been produced in Chicago, London and New...
Mexico Hosts 30th ITI World Congress
THEATRE PEOPLE FROM 60 countries gathered in Tampico, Mexico, from May 29 to June 4, for the 30th International Theatre Institute (ITI) World Congress, titled Quetzalcoatl, The Feathered Serpent. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The theme of the convening,...
Mother Courage
New York City: Fresh from her triumphant seven-play Greek cycle, Ellen Stewart--La Mama herself--leads a flock of New York theatre ducklings Sept. 30 as part of a weekend-long "Prelude to Off-Broadway" at the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center at the Graduate...
New York City: Dumpster Chic
A headpiece made from discarded potato chip bags. Gloves lined with leftover Christmas tinsel. A cape constructed from dental-dam latex, found on a New York City street. With costume elements scavenged from dumpsters, Brooklyn: The Musical, is hardly...
Partisan Passions
In the small town where I live in New Jersey, there's an explosion of lawn signs reading "Support Our Troops: Vote Bush Out" and a plethora of bumper stickers critical of the current administration. There are rainbow flags in most neighborhoods--indeed,...
Pondering a Renaissance at Tarrytown Retreat
"THIS WEEKEND IS ABOUT questions, not answers," said TCG executive director Ben Cameron in his opening remarks to the group gathered in Tarrytown, N.Y., April 23-25, for the final retreat of the National Theatre Artist Residency Program. The attendees--artists,...
Run, Baby, Run! Why America's Theatre Artists Should Get Themselves on the Ballot
America is a work in progress and it desperately needs a rewrite. It's time for theatre artists and professionals of all stripe and inclination to seriously consider running for local office. The sooner the better. Why now? Here are three compelling...
September: Theatre Almanac
70 YEARS AGO (1934) Max Reinhardt's production of A Midsummer Night's Dream at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles plays to 150,000 people over seven performances. The star-studded cast, which includes James Cagney as Bottom, Olivia de Havilland as...
Songs, Curios & Esoterica
New York City: What do Fiddler on the Roof, Cabaret and Rhoda in Potatoland have in common? Not only are they legends in their respective theatrical niches, they are now some of the best documented shows of the last century. The papers of John Kander...
South Bend, Ind.: Car Talk
"AVANTI" MEANS "FORWARD" IN ITALIAN, so it's no surprise that's the name the struggling auto manufacturer Studebaker chose for the new luxury model it rolled out as a last-ditch effort to stave off oblivion. The effort failed--Studebaker closed in...
Tom and His Feminine Mystique: Four Acclaimed Actresses Compare Notes on Tennessee Williams's Incomparable Heroines
BECAUSE TENNESSEE WILLIAMS WAS A HOMOSEXUAL, THE TRAGIC, WEARY and self-loathing female characters that populate many of his best-known plays have frequently been viewed as strange and suspect. So bitter (and for Williams, personally destructive) has...
Tony Randall: 1920-2004
When Tony Randall came into a room, everyone's posture improved. He would grace the rehearsal hall occasionally, his eyebrows perpetually lifted in curiosity and wit, and we all came to attention in his genial presence. Hyper-cool theatre people for...
Tropical Maladies: A Miami Festival Opens a Suitcase of Latin American Problems
A theatre festival is a dangerous thing. Its very name promises festivity, always a precious commodity. Festival promoters, moreover, usually offer a theme--something that will organize one's experience of theatregoing or of reading about it--but it...
Truly, Madly, Intimately: Viola Davis Breaks Free from the Tragic Characters She Is Often Corseted In
PEOPLE KEEP INSISTING THAT VIOLA DAVIS must be strong. Partly it's the roles she often plays, and the performances she delivers--displays of gut-wrenching, bone-crushing emotions that might turn a lesser actor into a pile of smoking ash. It makes her...
Twenty Questions
KIRSTEN BRANDT, artistic director of San Diego's Sledgehammer Theatre, is the author of the acclaimed play Berzerkergang and other works. The recipient of a Back Stage West award and other honors for directing, she will stage two plays in the upcoming...
Wilson on the Beach: A Visionary Production of an Ancient Epic Brings the Arts of Indonesia to the World
The theatre and dance of the islands of Indonesia are among the most ancient performing traditions in the world, and endure virtually intact--not as museum pieces, like the Noh theatre of Japan, or as self-conscious revivals, such as European folk...