American Theatre

American Theatre is a magazine containing news, features and opinions on American and international theatre. Published six times a year by the Theatre Communications Group, this periodical was founded in 1984.Subjects for American Theatre include drama and theatre. Nicole Estvanik Taylor is the Managing Editor and Jim O' Quinn is the Editor-in-Chief.

Articles from Vol. 12, No. 2, February

A Date with Death
Apologies to Tony Kushner, but there are no angels in America - except perhaps those flown by Foy. This country was founded by merchants, not mystics, and the paucity of myth is nowhere more acutely felt than in our bewildered flounderings when death...
Barry Kyle: Mixing Worlds Is His Specialty
What's the difference between directing at the Royal Shakespeare Company and at a former viewing pavilion for swine? Barry Kyle plans to find out. Since he emigrated to the U.S. from his native England in 1991 to found a theatre company in Louisiana,...
Blood Relations
THE PRIMORDIAL FAMILY DRAMA UNFOLDS IN A BOLDLY RECONCEIVED 'ORESTEIA' AT AMERICAN REP A desperate woman, spurned in love and yearning to take her own life, drowns her two young sons so that they will not have to grow up without a mother. She blames...
Guns and Huey Newton
ENSEMBLE: (softly) Niggers - with guns...niggers with guns. Who are these niggers with guns? No matter what your age or race, these words still sting, and playwright Robert Alexander exploits them for all they're worth. In his new work, Servant of the...
Is the NEA's Number Up?
Outlook uncertain as critics of the agency occupy key congressional posts As the newly elected Republican congressional leadership begins to lay out the ambitious legislative agenda for its takeover of Washington, it's hard not to trip over signs that...
June Havoc: Still Dancing
One day I woke up and said to myself, 'My God, Havoc, you're an old lady. And you're not even an old lady, you're old old.' "A veteran of vaudeville, Broadway, film and television, actor June Havoc delights in her 81 years and the good fortune that has...
Lonette McKee: Why the Caged Bird Sings
One day when she was four years old, Lonette McKee sat down at the piano and began singing and composing her own songs. Nobody in her family played or wrote music. Where did her inspiration come from? McKee offers a possible explanation: "It was from...
'Mockingbird' Rises like a Phoenix
From California to Mississippi, Harper Lee's venerable classic strikes a chord There it sits on American Theatre's top-ten list of the season's most popular plays, nestled amidst very contemporary dramatic studies of abortion, sexual harassment and...
Nightwatch Variations
Robert Auletta's new adaptation of The Oresteia distinguishes itself from its predecessors right from the first lines of the trilogy's first play. Auletta's version is based on a number of existing translations, but it leaves its sources behind in adopting...
Sarajevo: 1,001 Days under Siege
December, 1994 On Sunday evening, Jan. 29, at the Union Square Theatre, artists in New York will gather together as friends of the citizens of Sarajevo and the other besieged cities of Bosnia-Herzogovina to consider how we can support and assist each...
Tales of Sri Lanka, Nigeria
Two committed writers focus on personal stories from troubled nations A single white silk sheet is the only scenery to adorn Theater for the New City of New York's production of Voices from the Resplendent Island: Stories from Sri Lanka, a stark emblem...
The Americanization of the Holocaust
The Holocaust was a defining event of this century. To many Americans, however, its atrocities happened somewhere far off, "three thousand miles away," as a character in Arthur Miller's most recent play, Broken Glass, observes. So, too, in the history...
The Manifold Playwright
The director in possession of a distinct vision and an authoritative style has little use for the art of collaboration, right? Wrong. Paradoxically, many of the contemporary theatre's most original directors are refining and reenergizing the collaborative...
The Pleasures of Bravura Acting in London
Bravura acting and the British are virtually synonymous, although there is every reason on reflection why this ought not to be the case. Isn't Britain, after all, the country of modesty, of self-effacement, of a national embarrassment so profound that...
The Violence of Civility
CHILLINGWORTH: My theory is this: The weed grows from a secret buried in the heart of the man who rests in that unmarked grave. DIMMESDALE: How do you know it's a man? CHILLINGWORTH: Men have secrets. DIMMESDALE: And women do not? CHILLINGWORTH:...
Thomas Derrah: Falling into Place
Since joining the American Rep company in 1981, clowns, fools and character parts have been Thomas Derrah's mainstay. "I tend to get the big strange roles," he admits happily and then imagines a mock casting conference: " 'We need somebody to play a...