American Theatre

American Theatre is a magazine containing news, features and opinions on American and international theatre. Published six times a year by the Theatre Communications Group, this periodical was founded in 1984.Subjects for American Theatre include drama and theatre. Nicole Estvanik Taylor is the Managing Editor and Jim O' Quinn is the Editor-in-Chief.

Articles from Vol. 15, No. 5, May-June

How Rose Got Her Turn
Everything's coming up Stephen Sondheim in a titillating new biography of the musical-theatre master. Here, an excerpt chronicling how Gypsy conquered Broadway After West Side Story, Stephen Sondheim was determined to make his mark as a composer and...
Music in the Lower Depths
Once lost in the shuffle, an early Williams protest drama is greeted with acclaim Some years before he died in 1983, Tennessee Williams jokingly referred to himself as America's "oldest promising playwright," a morose reflection on the fact that his...
New World Order
Jose Rivera's Sueno revitalizes Calderon at Hartford Stage Sueno, Jose Rivera's adaptation of Calderon de la Barca's classic La Vida es Sueno (Life Is a Dream), starts out impressively enough. When John Ortiz's hirsute, muscular and scantily clad body...
Summer Festivals '98: Viva Teatro!
The riches of Latin theatre, a rarity in the U.S., can be sampled at world festivals Venturing far from their roots in 15th-century Spain and Portugal, the conquistadors spread Iberian culture across the New World, where it mixed with pre-Hispanic cultures....
The Diaspora Comes to Dartmouth
August Wilson and company discuss the future of black theatre in America Don't show us disdain, show us love," Victor Leo Walker II implored the no-shows and naysayers of the closed-door National Black Theatre Summit held at New Hampshire's Dartmouth...
The Persistence of Brecht: On the Centennial of His Birth, a New Wave of American Productions Tests Brecht's Relevance in the '90S
The homeless couple sits on a Manhattan sidewalk near Times square, a cardboard plea leaning against their drawn-up knees. Unbowed by their plight, this garrulous middle-aged pair - he sports a wide smile beneath a jaunty ski cap, she salutes all potential...
The Wall and the U.S.S.R. Are Gone; What Happens to Brecht's Long-Disputed Reputation Now?
One day we read in the paper that Bertolt Brecht's reputation - as playwright, poet, whatever - has sunk to zero. Next day, or maybe next year, we read that he is back up, or maybe higher than ever, the greatest writer of the century, or since Shakespeare....
Who Is Peer Gynt and Why Do We Care?
A quartet of new productions offers some surprising answers It's never been easy loving Peer Gynt. Like its irascible hero, Henrik Ibsen's epic picaresque is an unwieldy, meandering creature, stretching over five acts, two hundred pages and two continents,...