American Theatre

American Theatre is a magazine containing news, features and opinions on American and international theatre. Published six times a year by the Theatre Communications Group, this periodical was founded in 1984.Subjects for American Theatre include drama and theatre. Nicole Estvanik Taylor is the Managing Editor and Jim O' Quinn is the Editor-in-Chief.

Articles from Vol. 14, No. 1, January

Adam & Anthony Rapp: Genuine Bohemia
It's 1 p.m. - just about time for the Rapp brothers to start their day. Younger brother Anthony sits cross-legged on the sofa in the cluttered East Village apartment he and his brother Adam share with two other roommates, a dog, a cat and a Soloflex...
Art, Exile and Resistance: An Interview with Wole Soyinka
Even the briefest of encounters with Wole Soyinka - celebrated playwright, essayist, activist and winner of the 1986 Nobel Prize for Literature - is enough to make evident the qualities that are at the crux of his accomplishments. A formidable and centered...
Blues Elixir
During the premiere run of Keith Glover's Thunder Knocking on the Door at the Alabama Shakespeare Festival last fall, a local blues band approached the Festival and offered to play a pre-curtain set in exchange for free tickets to the sold-out show....
Bunny Love
Perhaps it's my current domestic situation (which now consists of a dog, a cat, a significant other and a nocturnal new-born named Zachary), or maybe I'm just a sucker for this kind of thing, but I just knew that Seattle Children's Theatre's production...
Dear Adolf
I want the audience to love these women," says artistic director Tuvia Tenenbom of the characters who drive the Jewish Theater of New York's new epistolary romance. Fine. You often want to love people you see on stage. "Some of these emotions are really...
Does Beckett Fit Our Reading Series?
Readings and workshops have become the staple of American institutional - and, increasingly, non-institutional - theatres. What was once a cottage industry dedicated to the discovery and development of new voices and works has become instead the raison...
Interdependence Day
The thoughtful Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne last summer chided presidential candidate Robert Dole for his favorable reviews of the box-office hit Independence Day and his more mixed assessment of the recent output of Hollywood in general [see...
Julie Jensen: Living Las Vegas
Camp filmmaker John Waters says he loves Los Angeles because "bad taste won the battle years ago." I'm willing to bet (and, despite the subject at hand, I'm no gambler) that Waters would love Las Vegas, too, and approve of Julie Jensen, the Utah-born...
Luoyong Wang: From Beijing to Broadway
Luoyong Wang is the first Asian actor to play the leading role of the Eurasian Engineer in Miss Saigon on Broadway. Questioned about the storm of protest that erupted when Jonathan Pryce was cast for the part, Wang offers a generous response, "It is...
Mutiny with a Mission
In 1805, sailing an ocean dominated by international commerce, American seafarer Captain Amasa Delano fancied himself a world adventurer exemplifying his young country's navigational - and moral - superiority. Then one day Delano and the crew of his...
Open Call: A Year in the Lives of 15 Actors Starting out in New York
During the 1994-95 theatre season, writer Todd London was in residence as guest literary director and lecturer at American Repertory Theatre and its Institute for Advanced Theatre Training at Harvard University. At the end of that year, he began researching...
Paradise North: New York Stage and Film Creates a Community at Vassar
In the early 1930s, the Group Theatre began a summer residency program at Green Mansions, a self-described adult camp for "moderns" in the Adirondacks in upstate New York. In exchange for providing entertainment at the camp four nights a week, members...
Stormy Season Ahead: Attacks on the Arts Are Likely to Continue in the Present Political Climate
Attacks on the arts are likely to continue in the present political climate For the not-for-profit world, November's elections were hardly something to cheer about. While President Clinton can claim a landslide victory on the electoral college front,...
Student Survey: A View from the Trenches of Training
The "Approaches to Theatre Training" issue survey can be one of the more daunting aspects of the editorial process at American Theatre. Yet despite its vastness and the challenges inherent in its compilation, the survey provides a notable opportunity...
The Duck Stops Here
Few productions possess the capacity to seduce like the mise-en-scene of the White House. All the details - the gleaming brass and polish of the Marine Band, the elegant little gold chairs perfectly lined up facing the dais, the comings and goings of...
The Life and Death of Puppets
Live actors, to be sure possess certain natural advantages over puppets - their operating mechanisms are self-contained, and they can endow characters with the complexity of real human form. These assets are nothing to sneeze at. Still, human actors...