American Theatre

American Theatre is a magazine containing news, features and opinions on American and international theatre. Published six times a year by the Theatre Communications Group, this periodical was founded in 1984.Subjects for American Theatre include drama and theatre. Nicole Estvanik Taylor is the Managing Editor and Jim O' Quinn is the Editor-in-Chief.

Articles from Vol. 10, No. 4, April

Barbara Gaines: She's Basking in the Bright, Cold Light of Lear
Break time on the set of King Lear. Barbara Gaines and a visitor were going to stick around the theatre, eat a carry-out lunch and talk. Gaines recommended the soup she was ordering, so the visitor ordered a cup, too. It turned out to be so peppery that...
Bottom Lines
When TCG published its first annual economic survey in 1974, new theatres were springing up in every corner of the country; playing to expanding subscription audiences; touring their work widely; providing employment for a growing number of artists;...
Escape from Happiness
Junior has been beaten up. He's lying on the kitchen floor of his mother-in-law Nora's rundown house in a bad urban neighborhood, bleeding. As Junior's wife Gail shouts for 911 to "Hurry, Dammit!", Nora gives Junior a command: "Look at yourself. You're...
Face Value
The least interesting issue in M. Butterfly is 'How do they have sex?' And certainly the least interesting issue in this play is 'How do I feel about Miss Saigon?' I don't really care about Miss Saigon. I think there are bigger issues at stake." David...
From Sendak's Kitchen: The Author and Illustrator Has Cooked Up a Hearty Menu for Children
As longtime ambassador to the land of children's imagination, Maurice Sendak has conjured visions of places where wild things dwell. He has painted a chimeric culinary skyline where a nude little boy made an airplane from pastry dough and nose-dived...
Jude Narita: No Exotic Flower
Jude Narita didn't fit the stereotype of Asian actors. So, in a tradition both old and new in theatre, the Japanese-American actress decided to write her own roles. Her subject: stereotypes. "I was always the tallest Vietnamese villager in the room,"...
Less Isn't More
Theatres aim to strike the delicate balance between downsizing & creative risk-taking. More and more these days, art imitates business. The grimmest financial picture in memory has sent America's nonprofit professional theatres scurrying to the...
Lightening Up
If this is, as the local press likes to describe it, "the make or break year" for the new South Africa, then the same must be said of the nation's theatre. "The Market is in transition just as the country is in transition," says Barney Simon, artistic...
My Yiddisha Drama
It isn't news that the Jewish heritage has had a tremendous impact on the American stage. Before Jackie Mason, there was Fiddler on the Roof; before Fiddler, there was Paddy Chayefsky; before The Tenth Man, there was Abie's Irish Rose, which combined...
Paula Vogel: No Need for Gravity
Paula Vogel's The Baltimore Waltz--one of the most widely produced new American plays of recent seasons--confronts the scourge of modern times obliquely, never mentioning AIDS in its 30 brief scenes. Instead, the playwright reimagines the absolute through...
Pondering the Plan
How will the President's economic proposals affect arts and nonprofit groups? President Clinton's broad economic plan for the country, presented in mid-February, includes several proposals that would impact the theatre community. A provision that would...
Reynolds Price: On Writing for Performance
TCG has just published Full Moon and Other Plays, the second collection of plays by award-winning novelist Reynolds Price. Like his dramatic trilogy, New Music (published by TCG in 1990), this new collection is graced with Price's undisputed talents...
Rich People Are Stingy
Fund-raisers, including "prospect researchers," are often viewed with disdain by many donors and people at foundations. They are seen as hucksters or snoops. But a strong case can be made for their valuable role in the larger interest of America's charitable...
Same Difference
Multiculturalism is the belated tribute the republic is paying the ethnic and racial minorities who for generations have enriched and transformed the common culture. This recognition is both overdue and healthy. But, as the past balance had swung too...
Springtime for Hitler: New York Public Library Surveys the Artistic Outcry against Fascism
In the wake of the breakup of the Communist bloc, national pride increasingly seems to be giving way to xenophobia and, even more dangerous, "ethnic cleansing"--an appropriate historical moment to reconsider the 1930s and the dangers of fascism. The...
Stephen Wade: Discovering Americana
Stephen Wade is not some hillbilly-turned-showbiz, nor is he a folkloric purist. He is a fuzzy-haired, sweet-smiled, wide-eyed guy in a business suit and tie who grew up in Chicago and fell in love with banjo music as a boy. Wade has devoted his life...
Theatre Facts 92
The worst economic recession in two decades took a heavy toll on the nation's theatres in 1992. Nonprofit theatres--subject to the same economic determinants as other enterprises, but historically undercapitalized and financially vulnerable--have reached...
The Butcher's Daughter
Some called her the first French feminist. More to the point, Olympe de Gouges was quite likely the first woman to be executed for forthright opinions about women's rights. This obscure French heroine has sparked the imagination of playwright Wendy Kesselman,...
The Wizards of Quiz
They were a perfect pair of antagonists for the television public: Columbia University English professor Charles Van Doren, the tall, handsome scion of America's WASP cultural elite, and Herb Stempel, the short, schlumpy little Jew from Queens, working...