American Theatre

American Theatre is a magazine containing news, features and opinions on American and international theatre. Published six times a year by the Theatre Communications Group, this periodical was founded in 1984.Subjects for American Theatre include drama and theatre. Nicole Estvanik Taylor is the Managing Editor and Jim O' Quinn is the Editor-in-Chief.

Articles from Vol. 21, No. 10, December

26 Form National Council
THE NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR THE American Theatre is a group of trustees from TCG member theatres who meet several times a year to discuss common concerns, and who serve as a resource for TCG in planning trustee-related programs. Sharing their national...
Auld Lang Zeisler
Is it the Salvation Army bellringers that are making me sentimental this time of year? Or is it the relief and gratitude of seeing our TCG annual report hit the streets--a report highlighting a strong year? Whatever the cause, this month's editorial...
Awards & Prizes
Next month, eight names will join a list of hundreds painted in gold on the lobby walls of Broadway's Gershwin Theatre. They are the new inductees to the Theater Hall of Fame: performers Estelle Parsons, Ian McKellen, Brian Murray, Len Cariou and the...
Belarus Artists Blacklisted
MINSK, BELARUS: In September, authorities in the former Soviet republic of Belarus blacklisted Andrei Kureichik, the playwright, activist and founder of a playwright's guild. In a Sept. 7 e-mail asking for international help, Kureichik reported that...
Boom Town on the East River: Brooklyn's Exploding Theatre and Arts Scene Is Powered by Economics and History
Context is everything. Dress me up and see. I'm a carnival barker, an auctioneer, a downtown performance artist, a speaker in tongues, a senator drunk on filibuster. --Jonathan Lethem, Motherless Brooklyn Harlem in the 1920s, Black Mountain...
December: Theatre Almanac
85 YEARS AGO (1919) The Lafayette Players of New York City open the Dunbar Theatre in Philadelphia, named for Paul Laurence Dunbar, the first African American to gain national prominence as a poet. The theatre--which eventually will be rechristened...
Editor's Note
Some gulfs are tough to bridge. There are those who like anchovies on their pizzas and those who don't. There are red states and blue states. There are theatre audiences on the East Coast and those on the West Coast. In the latter case, some mysterious...
Entrances & Exits
Libby Appel, artistic director of Oregon Shakespeare Festival for nearly a decade, will retire at the close of the 2007 season, the theatre announced in September. Appel and executive director Paul Nicholson signed contracts for the next three years,...
Greater Than the Sum of the Parts: Producers, Presenters and Artists Forge New Ground for Touring
Let's get talking--that was the recurrent motif at "Maximizing Partnerships: New Systems for Creating and Touring Theatre," a groundbreaking conference sponsored by TCG and the Association of Performing Arts Presenters in Pittsburgh this past June....
Here We Go, Yo ... a Manifesto for a New Hip-Hop Arts Movement: The Final Installment in a Series on the Convergence of Hip-Hop and Theatre
Twenty years ago, in 1984, I was a graffiti writer, a break-dancer and a rapper. I was pretty damn good, too; I was, however, not an artist in any of the above categories. I toyed with each discipline, didn't work too hard at the craft, and had no...
Hot, Hip and on the Verge: A Dozen Young American Companies You Need to Know
FIRST QUESTION FIRST: Are these the dozen companies that are heralding our theatrical future? Of course not. Hundreds of young, under-the-radar theatre troupes are capturing audiences and creating buzz in arts-friendly neighborhoods, storefronts, community...
In Memoriam
Christopher Reeve, best known for his portrayal of Superman, died of heart failure in October at age 52. In addition to his extensive film and TV work, Reeve was active in the theatre, appearing in over 150 plays. He began working at the Williamstown...
In Other Words: Four Theatrical Translators Unravel the Intricacies of Their Craft
ONE AFTERNOON IN CENTRAL MEXICO, I FOUND MYSELF in an impassioned discussion, in Spanish, with an eccentric and brilliant art professor. Surrounded by bright bougainvillea and towering palm trees, we delved into the intricacies of Macheth, whose dark...
Liz Duffy Adams State of Emergency: In Her Sci-Fi-Flavored Cosmos, Things Are Dangerous but Funny
Two apes are sitting in a tree. One says to the other, "We have to believe we're not endangered or we'd all go mad." New York experimental playwright Liz Duffy Adams loved this New Yorker cartoon (by Bruce Eric Kaplan) so much that she clipped it...
Manalapan, Fla.: Bear with Me
WHEN YOU ENCOUNTER AN ENORMOUS bear just a few feet away helping himself to the bag of birdseed on the deck, it's a dramatic moment, to say the least. For a playwright, though, it's also a priceless bit of local color. "There are a lot of bears roaming...
New York City: The Way You Sing Off-Key
Remember Will Hung, the delusional American Idol reject whose rendition of Ricky Martin's hit "She Bangs" made him a national laughingstock? He had nothing on Florence Foster Jenkins. A society lady who fancied herself a great coloratura soprano, Jenkins...
Rookie Leaders Master Craft of Management
The third New Artistic Leader Institute, an intensive program for new and prospective artistic leaders, took place Aug. 7-10 at McCarter Theatre Center in Princeton, N.J. For the first time, TCG partnered with Dance/USA, the national service organization...
Tales of Two Cities: A Pair of Theatre Histories Chronicle the Rise of New York and Chicago
THE CITY AND THE THEATRE by Mary C. Henderson, with a foreword by Gerald Schoenfeld. Back Stage Books, New York City. 382 pp, $24.95 cloth. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] A THEATER OF OUR OWN: A HISTORY AND A MEMOIR OF 1,001 NIGHTS IN CHICAGO by...
Theatres of Color Continue Discussion
ON SEPT. 23 AND 24, TCG, WITH SUPPORT from the Nathan Cummings Foundation, reconvened representatives from African-American, Asian-American, Latino and Native American theatres, as well as organizations serving multiethnic communities (such as the...
Twenty Questions
PAUL ZALOOM is known to younger fans as the wacky scientist of "Beakman's World," the 1990s kids' TV program now touring as a live stage show. Adults know him for three decades of iconoclastic puppet shows built around found objects (what some might...
Washington, D.C.: More Than Flesh & Blood
When playwright Craig Wright learned the real-life story that inspired his play Grace, something within him started to vibrate: "I heard about a love triangle--with religion, romance and disfigurement as elements--but what happens within that story...