American Theatre

American Theatre is a magazine containing news, features and opinions on American and international theatre. Published six times a year by the Theatre Communications Group, this periodical was founded in 1984.Subjects for American Theatre include drama and theatre. Nicole Estvanik Taylor is the Managing Editor and Jim O' Quinn is the Editor-in-Chief.

Articles from Vol. 25, No. 4, April

20 Questions
Film and stage actor KATHLESN TURNER debuts as a stage director with Beth Henley's Crimes of the Heart, now running through April 20 at Roundabout Theatre Company in New York, after playing this past summer at Williamstown Theatre Festival in Massachusetts....
Bonjour, Kurosawa
GENNEVILLIERS, FRANCE: Why is a 1965 Japanese film being interpreted this month in the French suburbs by a Californian theatre troupe? The reason can be traced to Oaxaca, Mexico--where John Malpede, taking a break from his Spanish studies, saw a retrospective...
Close to Home: Dorothy Parker Found Her 'Ladies of the Corridor' Living All around Her
For all of her life, Dorothy Parker ate bacon raw because she never learned to cook. Neither did she dust, scrub or pick up after herself. No matter; she didn't have to, because in the last century there existed the most extraordinary places to live:...
Craig Wright: Irons in the Fire; the Playwright-Screenwriter Is Thriving with One Foot in Hollywood and the Other on Stage
When Craig Wright left the Twin Cities to write for television in Los Angeles six years ago, some of his friends experienced that rueful poignancy theatre folk often feel when one of their own crosses the Styx into Hollywood. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]...
Darger Zone
CHICAGO: As the saying goes, behind every promenade-style theatrical paean to a reclusive artistic genius is a besotted fan. In the case of As Told by the Vivian Girls, that's Dog & Pony associate artistic director Devon de Mayo, who was hooked...
Editor's Note
Somewhere in distribution limbo there sits an unreleased film version of Wallace Shawn's unsettling, scaldingly funny 29-year-old play Marie and Bruce. Shawn's profanely unhappy married couple is played in the movie by Julianne Moore and Matthew Broderick,...
Friends with Money: If You've Got Deep Pockets (or Have Pals Who Do), the Spotlight May Be Yours-For a Price
THE CHALLENGE: "Money, it's a crime...." If you're a Pink Floyd fan, you know these lyrics. If you're in the theatre, you probably know them too, regardless of your musical tastes. Raising money is almost always an uphill battle--especially for those...
Julie Marie Myatt: An American Longing; Her Roaming Characters Wrestle with Unanswerable Questions
LONELINESS HANGS IN THE PLAYS OF JULIE MARIE MYATT. This is not to say her characters are pathetic or self-pitying. In fact, they generally bristle at the very mention of the subject: "You the Alone Police?" snaps one; "I want to be alone. How many...
Mainstream Remix: Frank Talk about Casting, Training and Presenting Actors and Works of Color
HOW DO WE WRITE OUR COUNTRY? In a thousand years' time, what stories will convey to others who we were? For us practitioners, the burden of responsibility in the freely imaginative process of making art is to the work itself--to its honesty and range...
Primary Concerns
AS THE 2008 ELECTION DEBATE ESCALATES, I AM reminded that presidential candidates generally don't spend much stump time expounding upon the usefulness of the arts in strengthening the nation. The national discourse seems to stand in contrast to numerous...
The Bluest Eye: Hartford Stage / Long Wharf Theatre
Eric Ting, DIRECTOR: The central figure in The Bluest Eye is Pecola Breedlove, who comes from a poor, dysfunctional African-American family in Ohio in the 1940s. Her great desire is to have blue eyes, because she believes that girls with blue eyes...
The Climates They Are a Changin'
NEW YORK CITY: The Chicago Humanities Festival did not always have weather in its forecast. The festival, which celebrates its 19th anniversary this coming fall, historically chose a different theme every year. Only recently did it refocus its energies...
The Monte Spin: A Stone's Throw from NYC, Audiences Line Up to See Her Irreverent Stagings of the Classics
Bundled up against the Thursday morning chill in overcoat, hat, gloves and matching scarf, Bonnie J. Monte rushes a little breathlessly into a rehearsal of A Midsummer Night's Dream. This 75-minute version of Shakespeare's most popular comedy, to be...
The Playwright Nobody (and Everybody) Knows: The Face and the Voice Are Ubiquitous. Wallace Shawn's Plays Are Another Matter
Among living American writers for the theatre today, Wallace Shawn is among those most respected by his peers and championed by serious critics. Yet many regular theatregoers, including people who work in the theatre, have never seen any of his plays...
Writing about Sex: Somebody's Got to Do It, Even at the Risk of Admonishment or Anarchy
For whatever reason, and I don't remember how it happened, I am now what people call "64 years old," and I have to admit that I started writing about sex almost as soon as I realized it was possible to do so--say, at the age of 14--and I still do it;...
Yellow Face
Fun with Race and the Media AN INTERVIEW WITH THE PLAYWRIGHT JACK VIERTEL: Yellow Face turns out to have much more on its mind than satire--satire is like the seed that has this very elaborate plant hiding within it. Was that the scheme from...