American Theatre

American Theatre is a magazine containing news, features and opinions on American and international theatre. Published six times a year by the Theatre Communications Group, this periodical was founded in 1984.Subjects for American Theatre include drama and theatre. Nicole Estvanik Taylor is the Managing Editor and Jim O' Quinn is the Editor-in-Chief.

Articles from Vol. 25, No. 2, February

20 Questions
Actor MARK RYLANCE was the first artistic director of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre, from 1995 to 2005. He is the creator and star of the BIG Secret Live, an interactive comedy that declares a "reasonable doubt" regarding the identity of the Bard. He...
An Actor's Garden of Verses
CYBERSPACE: One of the things country singer Willie Nelson and soap opera vet Anthony Herrera have bonded over in 20 years of friendship is the belief that poetry is best savored in performance. Herrera quotes his former teacher Stella Adler: "An actor...
A Room of Their Own
RALEIGH, N.C.: Like many small theatre groups, Burning Coal Theatre Company has known the nomad life, forever adapting its schedule and budget to rental facilities. But on Jan. 31 the theatre celebrated new autonomy with the opening of its first permanent...
Chicago at the Boiling Point: The City's Tragic 1995 Heat Wave Is Fodder for a New Drama
They died by the hundreds, most of them in isolation, many of them poor and elderly, shut away in the homes they had lived in for years. When the disaster struck, several government officials at first tried to deny its magnitude, then shifted toward...
Danny Newman: 1919-2007
Danny Newman died. Strange, I thought all legends were immortal. All right, I know, Danny wasn't a legend, he was legendary. He was a gentleman, a man of culture and a salesman who could have sold the Devil a match. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Ask...
Diversity on the Menu
CHICAGO: A new subscription-based program, designed to highlight the non-white theatre offerings in Chicago, seeks to address recent questions about the Illinois theatre capital's image as too predominantly white. Silk Road Theatre Project, the League...
Editor's Note
Yes, the stony visages affixed to illustrator Miguel Hernandez's faux Mount Rushmore on this month's fanciful cover represent the three leading lights of American theatre criticism who are still with us to discuss the volatile, much-castigated, underappreciated...
Eisa Davis: Voice with a Pedigree; Hip-Hop Wordplay and Musicality Ring out in Her Work
"My only trouble is not having more than 24 hours in the day," laughs Eisa Davis. She's just rushed in, breathless and bright-eyed, from a rewrite session devoted to her new play, Six Minutes, which was read at New York City's LAByrinth Theater Company...
Martin McDonagh's Bruegel Dreams
AROUND THE COUNTRY: "Where the feck is Bruges?" one of Martin McDonagh's characters would likely say. A beautifully preserved medieval city in Belgium, Bruges (pronounced "broozh") is about an hour from Brussels, and stepping inside this storybook...
New York City; Theatre: Mother's Little Helper
PUT YOUR PLANNER IN THE GLOVE compartment--soccer moms everywhere are heading to Off Broadway. Who is today's "soccer mom," anyway? Is she the sports-obsessed, stay-at-home spaz satirized in the stereotype? Not in Secrets of a Soccer Mom, beginning...
Notes on Heart and Mind: Or, the Promise of Theatre Criticism in the Republic of Broken Dreams
My dear anonymous letter writers, if you think it is so easy to be a critic, so difficult to be a poet or a painter or film experimenter, may I suggest you try both? You may discover why there are so few critics, so many poets. --Pauline Kael, I Lost...
Passing the Baton: When Changes in Leadership Loon, Time and Familiarity Can Smooth the Bumps
THE CHALLENGE: Every four years the U.S. presidential elections are held. What if that happened with artistic directors of theatres? Would there be quadrennial crisis? Imagine: a lame duck managing director! What is it about a shift of power that sends...
San Diego, Calif.: Touching Gloves; the History of Boxing Is Packed with Riveting Characters
The first African-American heavyweight champ, Jack Johnson, inspired playwright Howard Sackler's 1969 Tony-winner The Great White Hope; this past November, Merrimack Repertory Theatre of Massachusetts premiered David E. Lane's Tunney/Shakespeare in...
Should You Take a Critic to Lunch?. and Other Tough Questions about the State of Theatre Criticism, with Some Tentative Answers from Denver, San Francisco and Nashville
LET'S ASSUME THE IMPORTANCE OF THEATRE CRITICISM AS A GIVEN. Scores of artists and virtually all the major critics of the past century or two have articulated how good critical writing nourishes the theatre. From Oscar Wilde's famous 1890 essay...
The Critic as Thinker: A Discussion at the Philoctetes Center of New York City
ROGER COPELAND: The three panelists sitting around this table are three of the hardiest long-distance runners in the business, and because all of them have been so tirelessly productive for so many years, the task of introducing them and doing justice...
The Romance of Magno Rubio: Ma-Yi Theater Company
Loy Arcenas, DIRECTION AND SCENIC DESIGN: The characters you see in these photos are Filipino migrant workers in 1930s California, who move from area to area depending on where the crops are ready to be harvested. Much of what was true about their...
Thirst, Do No Harm
MINNEAPOLIS: The splashy series in progress at In the Heart of the Beast Puppet and Mask Theatre began in the lobby of its home, the 1930s Avalon Theatre. Shortly before settling there, HOBT devoted three years to an elaborate project all about water....
This Art Is Mine
Recent research and publications from luminaries in our field examine historic trends in the way individuals participate in the arts: from active participation (late-19th-century piano playing at home, drawing, etc.); to passive consumption (watching...
Washington, D.C.: A Frog with a Philosophy
AMONG THE MYRIAD CHALLENGES FACING A DIRECTOR director attempting to stage a musical about a frog stuck in a tree, the one that most surprised Amon Miyamoto was being thought of as a copycat. "On Broadway there were a lot of shows in the past in which...
What Women Want: Women's Project Is off Life Support and Reenergized-But Has All the Persistence and the Passion Added Up to Real Change for Women in the American Theatre?
ON the wall of Julie Crosby's office at Women's Project, an 8.5-by-ll-inch sheet of paper broadcasts a "Recipe for Success" in sizeable black letters: CREATE GREAT ART MARKET LIKE HELL BUILD THE BOARD ASK FOR MONEY "It's something Michael M. Kaiser,...