Journal of Narrative Theory

Articles from Vol. 41, No. 1, Spring

Autumn of the System: Poetry and Financial Capital
Part IIf the reign of finance in the cycle of capital accumulation is always a "sign of Autumn," we seem finally to have arrived at the onset of Winter (Braudel 246). Or so one must suspect from the collapse of the global economy that began its run-up...
Introduction: Non/Narrative
This special issue of the Journal of Narrative Theory represents a window onto a pressing, longstanding, and to me familiar conversation among writers and artists on the question of non/narrative. As a writer who has been engaged for several decades...
Presentism and Periodization in Language Writing, Conceptual Art, and Conceptual Writing
In this essay, I contrast three movements of contemporary art practice involving language - Language writing, conceptual art, and the recently emerged movement of conceptual writing - in terms of how each formally and historically encodes concepts of...
Present without Memory: Self-Forgetfulness, Omniscience and Non-Narration in the 2003 State of the Union Speech and in Lautréamont's Maldoror
The Narrator ReturnsIn his 2004 essay "Omniscience," Jonathon Culler troubles the generally tranquil critical waters that surround the concept of the omniscient narrator. Given its suspiciously standardized usage in literary analysis, it's not wholly...
Realism and Utopia: Sex, Writing, and Activism in New Narrative
The literary movement known as New Narrative emerged in San Francisco during the late 1970s. The cultural moment was one of engagement and conviction, agitation and uncertainty, as tensions were beginning to flare between new projects and old affiliations...
Scrambling Narrative: Niedecker and the White Dome of Logic
The Depression-era work of poet Lorine Niedecker, incubated in Wisconsin and quickened by contact with the American cosmopolitan core and transnational Surrealisms, provokes the following question: how do the spatial landscapes of capitalism in crisis...