Journal of Narrative Theory

Articles from Vol. 40, No. 3, Fall

Blameless Empires and Long-Forgotten Melodies: Anne Grant's "The Highlanders," Walter Scott's the Lay of the Last Minstrel, and the Poetry of Sympathetic Britishness
Anne Grant's first book of poetry, The Highlanders and Other Poems, has long been forgotten by literary history. Published in 1803, the year after the appearance of the initial volumes of Walter Scott's popular Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, Grant's...
Out of Joint: Memento as Contemporary Hamlet
Isn't storytelling always a search for origins, an account of one's entanglements with the Law, an entry into the dialectic of tenderness and hate?- Roland Barthes1I. The storyThis essay is a study in aesthetic resemblance, and, in a way, influence....
"Plastic Fork in Hand": Reading as a Tool of Ethical Repair in Ian McEwan's Saturday
The opening scene of Ian McEwan's Saturday is, in many ways, a lesson in reading. Waking in the early hours before dawn, the novel's protagonist, Henry Perowne - an urbane positivist and highly successful neurosurgeon by day - is drawn out of bed toward...
Textula
Lately he 's been overheard in Mayfair- Warren ZevonIIn his classic essay, "What Is an Author?" Michel Foucault displaces the term "author" into the term "author- function."1 In the essay's final sections, Foucault turns to the "'initiators of discursive...
Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossoms: The Renarrativation of Hiroshima Memories
IntroductionToday, Hiroshima is acknowledged to be a mecca of peace and draws over a million visitors annually from all over the world. In spite of the fact that this city had once served as a military center with a growing concentration of military...