Journal of Narrative Theory

Articles from Vol. 37, No. 2, Summer

A Confession of Faith: Notes toward a New Humanism
"To dwell in the ruins of the University is to try to do what we can, while leaving space for what we cannot envisage to emerge . . . [and] resources liberated by the opening up of disciplinary space, be it under the rubric of the humanities or of Cultural...
A New Species of Humanities: The Marvelous Progeny of Humanism and Postmodern Theory
My research and teaching fields are firmly rooted in the present, but as I work through certain vexed conceptions of the human/humane, reciprocal challenges posed by humanism and postmodern theory, and how all of this might relate to the future of the...
An Historian's Notes for a Miloszan Humanism
"O my love, where are they, where are they going"-Czeslaw Milosz, "Encounter" (1978, 3)The awkward term "humanism" has served as the title of too many movements and ideals, and seems drained of significance, like a wrinkled old balloon. To speak of revising...
Becoming More (Than) Human: Affective Posthumanisms, Past and Future
The human long presumed by traditional Enlightenment and post-Enlightenment humanism is a subject (generally assumed male) who is at the center of his world (that is, the world); is defined by his supreme, utterly rational intelligence; does not depend...
B(eing)-Students
This essay draws a great deal of its energy from the historical intersection of humanist psychology and education, as well as from a philosophicallyoriented set of ecological insights whose elaboration by marine biologist Edward Ricketts in the 1930s...
Mourning Rights: Beowulf, the Iliad, and the War in Iraq
The Iliad speaks to the way we think about war, because the one impulse that has proved as enduring as human beings' urge to make wars is their need to make sense of them. The first step in making sense of any such loss is to mourn the dead. Nothing...
Who Cares? Novel Reading, Narrative Attachment Disorder, and the Case of the Old Curiosity Shop
"to feel and know that, come what might, they were alone in the world with no one to help or advise or care about them"-Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop (76)"heaps of fantastic things ... huddled together"In an oft-cited passage from the first...