Journal of Narrative Theory

Articles from Vol. 40, No. 1, Winter

A Look into the Abyss: The Unsolvable Enigma of the Self and the Challenges of Metaphysical Detection in Martin Amis's Night Train1
Although its origins are traceable to the 1930s, the greatest surge of the metaphysical detective story and of the critical inclination to examine detective narratives within this framework coincides, to a remarkable extent, with the emergence of postmodern...
Get off the Point: Deconstructing Context in the Novels of William S. Burroughs
"Ideology only corresponds to a corruption of reality by signs; simulation corresponds to a short circuit of reality and to its duplication through signs."- Jean Baudrillard, Simulacra and SimulationOne of the most unique features of WiUiams S. Burroughs...
Ludic Economies of Wuthering Heights
"I have said nothing about Wuthering Heights because that astonishing work seems to me a kind of sport." R. F. Leavis, The Great TraditionIn explaining why he says "nothing" about Wuthering Heights in The Great Tradition, Leavis actually gestures toward...
Realism and Parable in Charlotte Yonge's the Heir of Redclyffe
'[T]he parable of actual life led [. . .] into the higher truth."- Charlotte Yonge, More BywordsCritics writing in the vein of the "ethical turn" in literary studies have fruitfully explored the ethics of reading, including how narratives construct ethical...
Telling Stories: Unreliable Discourse, Fight Club, and the Cinematic Narrator
"The first rule of Fight Club is, you do not talk about Fight Club."-Fight Club (1999)Forty-five minutes into David Fincher's film, the viewer enjoys a brief respite from its violence and gore: a surreal sex scene featuring the protagonist's would-be...