Journal of Narrative Theory

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 1, Winter

Aesthetic Depersonalization in Louise Welsh's the Cutting Room
The Scottish author Louise Welsh's crime novel, The Cutting Room, was published in 2002 to immediate critical claim and commercial success.1 The Cutting Room is part of a strand of post-war Scottish writing that focuses on the phenomenology of personal...
"Dispersed Are We": Mirroring and National Identity in Virginia Woolf's between the Acts
The fluctuations of the mind, and the ever failing effort of individual subjectivity to create a solid sense of self, form a central theme in Virginia Woolf's work. Most of her novels examine this dynamics within the consciousness of one subjectivity,...
Indians in Shakespeare's England as "The First-Fruits of India": Colonial Effacement and Postcolonial Reinscription
The triumph of theory in a poststructuralist age might seem to be the prohibition of the real. The threatening specter of essentialism translates factuality into the unknowable, renders ambivalent if not disallows the value of the archive. Yet, theory...
The "Invisible" Woman: Narrative Strategies in the Stone Diaries
To play with mimesis is thus, for a woman, to try to recover the place of exploitation by discourse, without allowing herself to be simply reduced to it. It means to resubmit herself-inasmuch as she is on the side of the 'perceptible,' of 'matter'-to...
The Other Side of the Picture: The Politics of Affect in Virginia Woolf's Three Guineas1
For a long time, the politics of Virginia Woolf has been implicitly equated with the emotion of anger: the angrier Woolf appears, the more her writing is read as political. The difficulty of the Woolfian politics of affect arises as it is also Woolf...