English Studies in Canada

Articles from Vol. 37, No. 3-4, September-December

"A Comic Epic-Poem in Prose": A Half Century of Engaging Northrop Frye's Canadian Criticism
A funny thing happened at the 2007 University of Ottawa symposium devoted to the work of Northrop Frye. As the presenters for the single panel concerned with Frye's writings on Canada assumed their places at the head of the room, somewhere between...
Alan Richardson, the Neural Sublime: Cognitive Theories and Romantic Texts
Alan Richardson, The Neural Sublime: Cognitive Theories and Romantic Texts. Johns Hopkins up, 2010. 194 pp. Rather than resisting the research and social power of the sciences, the field of literary studies has new opportunities to leverage scientific...
Christine Ramsay, Ed. Making It like a Man
Christine Ramsay, ed. Making it Like a Man. Waterloo: Wilfred Laurier up, 2011. 372 pp. $42.95. As a social scientist, I have taught and published mostly within gender and women's studies venues, although my current appointment is as Chair of the...
Come Back to the Ranks Ag'in, Huck Honey!
In the last handful of years, the Esc roundtable has become an important ongoing feature of our association's annual meeting and conference, a place to think out loud about the conditions of our work, and I was delighted to be asked to participate...
"Community, Identity, Stability": The Scientific Society and the Future of Religion in Aldous Huxley's: Brave New World
Michel went over to the bookshelf and took down What Dare I Think? and handed it to Bruno. "It was written by Julian Huxley, Aldous's older brother, and published in 1931, a year before Brave New World. All of the ideas his brother used in the novel--genetic...
Heirs, Apparently: Nation-Building in Isabella Valancy Crawford's Winona
WINONA; or, The Foster Sisters, only recently reprinted for the first time since its serialized appearance in 1873, is one of Isabella Valancy Crawford's first publications. Editors Len Early and Michael A. Peterman, in their extensive introduction...
HP Sauce and the Hate Literature of Pop Art: Bill Bissett in the House of Commons
The minister, the Government and its vehicle, the Canada Council, are weak and full of fear--fearful of not appearing avant garde, fearful of being labeled culturally illiterate. Robert Wenman, MP Fraser Valley West (PC), 13 December 1977 they...
Introduction: Academic Rites of Passage
These are the passages of thought from the light air into the heavy flesh until from the burning all the slumb'ring dark matter comes alight Robert Duncan "Rites of Passage I" Never one to miss a productive (and sometimes groan-worthy) pun, American...
Leon Surette. Dreams of a Totalitarian Utopia: Literary Modernism and Politics
Leon Surette. Dreams of a Totalitarian Utopia: Literary Modernism and Politics. Montreal and Kingston: McGill Queens up, 2011. 363 pp. US$59.95. In this new volume, Leon Surette historicizes the troubling political commentaries made by T. S. Eliot,...
Lily Cho. Eating Chinese: Culture on the Menu in Small Town Canada
Lily Cho. Eating Chinese: Culture on the Menu in Small Town Canada. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2010. 207 pages. When one Chinese meets another Chinese who is a stranger, a ready way to index each other is through the dialects they speak:...
"My Poor Mistress": Marital Cruelty in the History of Mary Prince
In 1828 the west Indian slave Mary Prince traveled to England with her fourth master, John Wood, where she was legally free for the first time in her life. Yet her plans to return to Antigua to live with her husband were complicated by the fact that,...
Passing Among
There is no Byzantium on our campuses where we can stand and watch whatever is past, or passing, or to come, although some of us may feel that we do during such holy fire rites-of-passage moments as graduation or a newly granted tenure or crc professorship....
Schooled!
At a certain point in one's academic life, the mood changes. I don't mean the successive kinds or degrees of relief that attend appointment, tenure, and promotion but, rather, the grammatical mood in which we render a narrative account of ourselves....
Shakespeare and the Domestic: Geraldo U. De Sousa's at Home in Shakespeare's Tragedies and Frederic B. Tromly's Fathers and Sons in Shakespeare: The Debt Never Promised
Shakespeare and the domestic is a dauntingly capacious rubric for a short review essay, and Geraldo U. de Sousa's At Home in Shakespeare's Tragedies and Frederic B. Tromly's Fathers and Sons in Shakespeare: The Debt Never Promised have little in common...
The "New-Formed Leaves" of Juvenilia Press
April has brought the youngest time of year, With clinging cloaks of rain and mist, silver-gray; The velvet, star-wreathed night, and wind-clad day; And song of meadow larks from uplands near. The new-formed leaves unfold to greet the sun, Whose light...
The Quiet Rites and Riotous Hopes of a Graduate Student
The rites of passage that have most changed me as a graduate student have been the hallways, crevices, secret alleys, and long passages of texts that I have been asked to read and write. I have had the best conversations of my life in graduate school....
The Right to Pass: Unblocking the Passage from Student to Doctor
Rites of passage, first defined in 1909 by the French anthropologist Arnold van Gennep, refer to culturally sanctioned rituals individuals perform to denote and encourage their transition from one stage of life to another. These rites signal major...
The Traumatic Realism of Christopher Marlowe's the Massacre at Paris
The massacre at paris (c. 1592) has the dubious distinction of being considered Christopher Marlowe's worst play, a poorly written and poorly structured piece of Protestant propaganda surviving only in what evidence suggests is a memorial reconstruction....
Verglas: Narrative Technique in Anne Carson's "The Glass Essay"
Anne Carson published Glass, Irony, and God in 1995, and although the collection was not showered with prizes like some of her later books its opening poem, "The Glass Essay," has come to define Carson's narrative technique. The place of "The Glass...
When Motilities Were Modern Kitsch: The Serial Seductions of Renfrew of the Mounted
In the first half of the twentieth century, and perhaps still today, one of Canada's most recognizable cultural exports was the Mountie, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) officer, wearing the signature red coat of his dress uniform and sitting...
Zong!'s "Should We?": Questioning the Ethical Representation of Trauma
The 2008 publication of Zong! marks M. NourbeSe Philip's first collection of poetry since the groundbreaking and award-winning She Tries Her Tongue, Her Silence Softly Breaks in 1988. (1) In taking as its subject the 1781 massacre of slaves from the...
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