Twentieth Century Literature

A quarterly journal of scholarly literary criticism publishing refereed papers on all aspects of twentieth-century literature, including English-language essays on literature in other languages.

Articles from Vol. 40, No. 3, Fall

Bernard Malamud's Rediscovery of Women: The Impact of Virginia Woolf
"Don't go in the rain, Willie, not in the rain. You will catch a cold, the doctor will come, you will get pneumonia" (Dubin's 68-69). Dubin walking in Venice thinks of death and his mother, an association that recurs throughout Malamud's fiction. He...
Blasting the Bombardier: Another Look at Lewis, Joyce, and Woolf
It has been with considerable shaking in my shoes . . . that I have taken the cow by the horns in this chapter. (Wyndham Lewis, Men Without Art 140) In her essay "Jellyfish and Treacle: Lewis, Joyce, Gender and Modernism," Bonnie Kime Scott - leader...
Iris Murdoch and the Good Psychoanalyst
Several . . . films [Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, Field of Dreams, and Star Trek V: The Final Frontier, 1989] send their heroes searching for hints of God's presence in the universe, on quests for spiritual meaning. . . . And like many New Age...
Jarrell, the Mother, the Marchen
"There is one story and one story only," Randall Jarrell was fond of quoting, from Robert Graves, about those poets whose enabling obsessions he felt he had penetrated to their depths. It was true of many of them, but truest of all of himself. Appropriately,...
Myth and Identity in Joyce's Fiction: Disentangling the Image
The Literary Revival of turn-of-the-century Dublin was much concerned with expressing Irish aspirations through heroes. Finn and Cuchullain supplied imaginatively what Ireland had not been able to achieve in reality: an Irish hero who vanquished all...
Re-Dressing Feminist Identities: Tensions between Essential and Constructed Selves in Virginia Woolf's 'Orlando.'
Discussing the source of the self is never an easy task. Autobiographical desires get displaced into biographical sketches, which are then readily transformed into broad historical portraits. Ultimately, the task of re-narrating all these simultaneous...
'Vile Bodies': A Futurist Fantasy
One of Evelyn Waugh's most perceptive critics, Robert Murray Davis, has commented that "like many writers more obviously committed to modernist experiment, Waugh took great care to guide his readers by means of external form" (355). It is true that Waugh...
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