The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 23, 2004

A Confused Notion of 'Sin'
Imagine living a life of perpetual sin. Imagine the enormous guilt you would feel if you perceived that almost all your waking hours consisted of actions that, in their own little way, are devastating to the welfare of humankind.Every time you fill up...
A Lonely Italian Retiree Puts Himself Up for Adoption
Seven cats and a modest book collection are all that 79-year-old Giorgio Angelozzi has for company on most days.High up in the hills east of Rome, the retired teacher lives in a humble two-room flat overlooking a valley of rolling olive groves. The house...
An Indian Vision, Carved in Limestone ; in New Museum, 'Living Culture' Takes Precedence over Anthropology
The newly opened National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) is what its director likes to call "different." Unlike past museums set up by outsiders, this showplace is directed, curated, and staffed largely by native Americans.With its rough limestone...
Despite Bumper Harvest, World's Cupboard Grows Bare
Grain reserves worldwide have fallen to their lowest level in 30 years. Population continues to mushroom. Bumper harvests this year probably will meet demand, but only barely.This week the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)...
Does US Law Mute Voices of Churches?
Religion is striking a high profile in the 2004 campaign. But there are those eager to see it take on a much larger role - both now and in the future.More than 130 members of the US House of Representatives want to amend the law that prohibits partisan...
Doors Closing, Hearts Opening ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
I came home one afternoon to find my husband sitting at the kitchen table, abruptly laid off from a job he'd held for almost two decades.He numbly talked about retiring.I immediately began to pray, making the transition to a calmer state of thought by...
Eyetrack: How You Read the News Online
What are you looking at?...And what were you looking at a second ago? What will you look at next, and while we're at it, have you checked out the ad - there, just below the navigation bar?Are you back yet?You may not devote a great deal of thought to...
Hockey on Ice
Team owners and players in the National Hockey League, headlocked in a labor dispute that could idle Zamboni ice-cleaners for the entire season, think they're stiffing each other. But what they're really doing is thumbing their noses at their fans.In...
In Shark Tank, a Great White Survives ; A White Shark in Captivity Could Offer New Insights on the Mysterious and Feared Creature
. - For a moment, Jill Udoutch stands face to face with a childhood nightmare. Raised on "Jaws," she was scared to go into the water. So when the pale snout of a great white shark emerges in the deep blue veil of seawater just a few feet away from her,...
Iran Rejects Curbs on Nuke Plans ; Defying UN Agency Orders, Iran Starts to Enrich Uranium. Is It for Energy or a Weapon?
Defiance plays well in Iran. That's one reason why the Islamic republic is now resuming steps toward uranium enrichment - directly flouting a UN agency's demand to stop the development of technology that could be used in a nuclear bomb.Iran's calculation...
It's a Bird! It's a Plane! No, It's - an Office Tool
"It flashed by like a steel thunderbolt, the ground shaking under me, in a blast of air that almost sucked me into its whirlwind."Not surprisingly, these words do not refer to a pencil sharpener. Not directly.They open Raymond Loewy's impassioned description...
It's Iran More Than Iraq
Two years from now, during either a Kerry or Bush presidency, Iran will probably be much more of a security issue for the United States than Iraq.Yet the campaigns of the two presidential candidates remain focused on Iraq, even though their approaches...
Letters
Respect American Jews; keep open discussion on IsraelRegarding the Sept. 15 article "350 years of Jewish history in America": I am a Muslim American and I am impressed by the accomplishments of the Jewish people in America. Their early arrival and their...
Mobile-Home Decay Prompts New Moves to Mend Landscape ; Problem of Abandoned or Storm-Wrecked Single-Wides Pushes States toward Controversial 'Predisposal' Fee on New Units
When storms like the summer's hurricane trio stomp through the rural south, they sometimes land hardest on the structures that have become icons of vulnerability: tin-roofed, "single-wide" mobile homes. Thousands of them were overturned in the storms,...
No Sugarcoating the Bad News
In the beginning, there was candy. It was, well, fattening. It was intended to be fattening. That was the whole point of candy. Or actually, check that. The whole point of candy was to give the mouth and body pleasure and, as an unfortunate but unavoidable...
Reporters on the Job
* Drinking in Russia: Correspondent Fred Weir admits that he was "Russianize" when he first moved to Moscow. "I thought that Soviet men wouldn't trust you unless you drank vodka with them," says Fred. But in the last decade, he has reformed his drinking...
Russia Cracks Down on Beer Ads ; Beer Consumption Has Doubled over the Past Five Years, Prompting Legislators to Implement New Rules This Month
It's a warm September evening, school is out, and scores of kids hanging around Moscow's Tanganka Square have loaded up with pints of beer. They stand around in mixed groups of boys and girls, laughing, talking, and swigging."I don't drink beer to get...
S. Asia Struts on UN Catwalk ; Blue Turbans. Dark Suits. Cropped Beards. Each Is Designed to Send Important Signals
As India's new prime minister, Manmohan Singh steps up to the podium this week to give his maiden speech at the annual United Nations General Assembly meeting in New York, there will be policy wonks watching every word to determine the man's vision for...
Signs of an Earlier American
Al Goodyear is holding his breath in anticipation. Within days, the affable archaeologist expects to read the results of lab tests indicating that stone tools he recently found in South Carolina are 25,000 years old - or older.Such results would be explosive....
'Slow Food' and a Bit of Gardening - One Way to Stop the Bulge
Americans aren't just overweight. They're fat. More than 30 percent of us weigh at least 30 pounds more than we should, according to the National Institute of Health. Statistics show that debilitating conditions medically related to obesity have made...
Storm Impact Big, but Maybe Not Long-Lived ; Rebuilding Ravaged Areas Will Take Years, but Experts Don't See Andrew-Style Impact on Insurance System
After Florida took a pounding from three hurricanes, there were fears about the long-term effects: tourists would book elsewhere; the nation would run out of oranges this winter; and, everything from insurance rates to the price of plywood would skyrocket.Now,...
The 527 Factor: It's Big in State Races, Too ; Sixty outside Groups - and Counting - Make Their Dollars Felt in Campaigns
While groups such as MoveOn.org, and Swift Boat Veterans for Truth have grabbed national attention with their growing advertising clout in presidential politics, other so-called 527 committees are making their dollars felt in state races across the US.*...
The Heart of a Grateful Teacher Belongs to Those Who Heard
Not long ago, my college English department hosted a reunion night at which faculty and students gathered for some catching-up. Added to the predictable embarrassments on both sides - "What's your name again?" "Don't you remember me?" - were the heartening,...
The Sharpener Brought Us to a Grinding Halt
For a first-grader in September, a pencil sharpener is nothing short of a miracle. That hand crank rasps and grates, drowning out the teacher's drone. The scent of fresh wood shavings rises to the nostrils, smelling like newly mown grass, while graphite...
To Boost US Security, an Energy Diet ; Efficiency Could Be the Cheapest and Easiest Way to Wean America from Foreign Oil
Betsy Rosenberg used to ferry her daughter around town in a gas- swilling SUV until she got fed up one day two years ago and traded it in for a gas-sipping hybrid."I hate waste," says Mrs. Rosenberg, a Toyota Prius owner who now runs a San Francisco-area...
Why Women Are Edging toward Bush ; A Growing Group of 'Security Moms' Puts National Safety at the Top of Their List, Weakening a Traditionally Democratic Base
Amid all the strategizing and message-mongering and imagemaking of the 2004 campaign, all aimed at attracting various demographic groups, one stark fact has risen to the top: President Bush has made serious inroads with women voters, to the point where,...