The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 19, 2005

A Cheaper America Doesn't Make It a 'Must See' ; Fears about Security Hassles and Poor Image Keep Foreign Tourists Away
When Alison Fisher and Chris Whitehouse stepped off their London- New York flight two weeks ago, they were delighted to find that the money in their pockets stretched a whole lot further than two years ago.The British couple had considered Australia...
Africa Can't Be a World Apart
A tsunami of hunger is washing over sub-Saharan Africa this year, caused by drought, conflict, and inept government. More than 20 countries are in need of food aid, especially 2.6 million refugees from Sudan's war-ravaged Darfur province.But this continent-wide...
A Light for the World
In 1908 few women had the authority or resources to start a daily newspaper. But late during that summer Mary Baker Eddy wrote a brief note to the directors of her church and to the trustees of The Christian Science Publishing Society telling them it...
An Iraqi Family Patiently Adapts to Life in the Danger Zone
Car bombs and violence have killed some 500 Iraqis in the past three weeks, making Baghdad's streets as mean as ever.But those streets are where 11-year-old Mahmoud has spent six hours a day, every day, after school, selling bottles of chilled Pepsi...
Can Hybrids Save US from Foreign Oil? ; Red-Hot Demand for Priuses Causes Doubters to Take Second Look
Actress Cameron Diaz and Roy Jefferson, a retired government accountant from Fargo, N.D., have something in common: They both love their hybrid gas-electric cars that get 50-plus miles per gallon."I laugh when I go by the gas stations" without filling...
Chaos to Condos: Lower Manhattan's Rebirth ; Nearly Four Years after 9/11, There Are More Homes, Grassy Parks - and New Challenges, Too
From atop a trapeze platform on lower Manhattan's West Street, the gap in the skyline where the World Trade Center once stood stands out far more sharply than from below. But so, too, do the signs of a remarkable residential resurgence under way in the...
Everything from a Printer to a Pail of Dirt
I am not a pack rat in the orthodox sense of the term. I don't have towers of accumulated newspapers forming skylines in my garage; I have not kept every greeting card I ever received; and I don't have a horde of cardboard boxes "just in case."However,...
How I Move My Stuff Along
Eight years ago I moved from a small apartment in a big city to a big farmhouse in a small town. The outward appearance of this green- shuttered, 1860s Maine farmhouse is one of quaintness and tranquility. Open the door, however, and you will see what...
Israel Offers Settlers a Land Swap ; Sharon Hopes a Plan to Move Gaza Settlers to Land North of the Gaza Strip Will Ease Resistance to Leaving
The Nitzanim sand dunes just north of this Israeli seaside city are one of the largest unspoiled stretches of coastline left in Israel.But for Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, the land tract may hold the key to defusing the resistance of some 8,500...
Latino Politicians Gain Clout in US
The election this week of Mexican-American Antonio Villaraigosa as mayor of Los Angeles is the latest exclamation point in a story of Hispanic political empowerment that has been unfolding steadily nationwide for more than three decades.The high-profile...
Letters
Does legalizing prostitution send the right message?Regarding the May 11 article "Rethinking a legal sex trade": I don't think legalizing the sex trade solves anything. It sends the message that people should not learn to control themselves. It sends...
Manchester Fans Cry 'Offsides'
What do fans do when their home team is sold to someone not from the home town? Burn the new owner in effigy? Threaten to cancel season tickets? Promise massive protests at the next game? Try to start a breakaway team?All of the above, it seems, given...
Now Hiring: The Hot Jobs of the Moment
This year, Ernst & Young hopes to hire 9,000 new accountants in the United States.EnerDel, which makes lithium batteries, no longer hires people when it needs them. Rather, it hires them when it finds them.And Marietta College in Ohio is proud that every...
On the Horizon
Measuring wind potentialIf only 20 percent of the Earth's "wind-power potential" were tapped, humanity could meet all of its electricity demand seven times over, according to a new study.Two researchers at Stanford University's Department of Civil and...
Progress on Political Rights for Kuwaiti Women ; on May 16, the Kuwaiti Parliament Voted to Give Women the Right to Vote and Run for Office. the Next Election Is 2007
In one of the last remaining corners of the Middle East where women couldn't vote, democracy took a step forward this week.On May 16, the Kuwaiti National Assembly voted 35-23 to give women the right to vote and run for parliament. The assembly attached...
Reporters on the Job
* The Right to Vote : Contributor Jamie Etheridge expected urban, university-educated women in Kuwait to applaud the parliament's decision to give women the right to vote (page 7). "I totally didn't expect that a number of the professional women educated...
Suddenly, a Light Shines on Nuclear Power
The mood in the nuclear power industry has dramatically brightened. Both in the United States and abroad, industry officials, dare we say it, radiate optimism.At atomic power plants, the protesters are gone. In American universities, most courses in...
Tales of Atrocity Emerge after Uzbek Clashes
As the turbulence in Uzbekistan quiets, two very different pictures are emerging.Activists tell a story of a mass atrocity that resulted in the death of hundreds, while the government says they stamped out an armed rebellion and didn't shoot a single...
The Rising Economic Cost of the Iraq War ; One Estimate of the Military Pricetag: $5 Billion Each Month
Fighting in Iraq has been prolonged and remains intense enough that it has pushed the total cost of US military operations since Sept. 11, 2001, close to that of the Korean War.Despite the yawning federal deficit, Congress hasn't blinked at this price....
The Rush to Fight Missiles Aimed at Planes ; Thousands of Shoulder-Fired Weapons Are Unaccounted for, Intensifying a Search for Ways to Reduce Terror Threat to Jets
You can be pretty sure that when those two lost pilots in a little Cessna wandered out of Pennsylvania and into highly restricted air space near the Capitol and the White House last week, it wasn't just F-16 fighter jets and Blackhawk helicopters that...
To Muslims, Not Just a Book
At the birth of a Muslim child, verses of the Koran are recited into the ear of the newborn, signifying a blessing and a hope that the holy book will resonate strongly in that child's life.From then on, the words of the Muslim scripture structure and...
To New York, with Love ; First Published in the Christian Science Sentinel
Mothering. Doesn't the term call up images of adoring one's young? Of nudging them gently in the right direction? And also perhaps of gripping fear? That up-all-night fear of what might happen to them when they're out of our reach. Thankfully, I have...
To Track Global Warming, Watch the Water Flow
Say "climate change" and people tend to think global warming. But we also should think about water, specifically, the cycle of precipitation, evaporation, and river flow that is a key climate component. A little decline here, a little boost there, can...
When 'I Robot' Becomes 'We Robot'
It sounds like classic sci-fi: Robots, linked by a common network, roam the land. When one unit discovers something, they all know it instantly. They use artificial intelligence to carry out their mission.Soon, such marching orders will be real, carried...
Will 'Star Wars' Reverse Declining Cinema Attendance?
Movie theater owners all over the country are hoping that the new "Star Wars" will be a force to be reckoned with. More specifically, they're hoping the film will turn around a box-office slump that has gone on now for nearly three months, the longest...
With 'Sith,' Lucas's Empire Strikes Back
'Star Wars: Episode III: Revenge of the Sith" begins the way you knew it would. "A long, long time ago in a galaxy far, far away..."Has any other phrase been so indelibly engraved in pop-culture consciousness over the past three decades? It's been 28...
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